Northwestern Pacific Railroad

Northwestern Pacific Railroad
Northwestern Pacific Railroad
Reporting mark NWP
Locale California's North Coast from Marin County - Eureka
Dates of operation c. 1907–Present
Successor Southern Pacific Transportation Company
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) (standard gauge); 80 miles (130 km) of system originally, 3 ft  (914 mm)
Headquarters Schellville, California

The Northwestern Pacific Railroad (reporting mark NWP) is a regional railroad serving California's North Coast. The railroad currently runs on 62 miles of the 462 mile main line, stretching from Schellville, California to Eureka, California. The operating stretch is located between the California Northern Railroad interchange at Schellville and southern Windsor.

The NWP mainline is owned by Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit, or "SMART", a planned commuter railroad, from the Ignacio wye in Marin County, to the Healdsburg depot. The line between Schellville and Ignacio, and from north Healdsburg to Eureka is owned by the North Coast Railroad Authority.

The NWP's current locomotive roster includes an ex-Burlington Northern GP9, numbered 1922, and a Tier-3 hybrid "Genset" locomotive, numbered 2009 and leased from RJ Coreman Railpower.

The NWP was started in the late 1800s as a combined enterprise between the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific railroads, who both realized only one railroad would be profitable in the Eel River canyon. They two railroads bought and combined around 43 railroads and combined them all to create the Northwestern Pacific. Gauges range from 3 foot to standard, and included a early wooden monorail. In 1936, the Santa Fe sold its interests to the SP, which assumed full control.

Beginning in 1990, public interests began snatching up bits and pieces of the "Southern End," or from Willits to Schellville. The North Coast Railroad Authority was born by government action to save the NWP from abandonment. The NWP was finally sold from the SP in 1995, and the NWP was reborn in 1996, under new control, but was closed by the Federal Railroad Authority in early 2001 when storm damage and money problems led the NWP to become unsafe.

In July 2011, the Federal Railroad Administration emergency order was lifted, allowing freight trains to resume service.

NWP #1922 near Petaluma, California, October 21, 2011
Vegetation encroaches on Swauger Creek trestle near Loleta.


Contents

Predecessor Lines

Mesa Grande train station, about 1910
Northwestern Pacific Railroad
Technical
Line length 462.6 km
Track gauge 1435 mm
Northwestern Pacific Railroad (Main Line)
Legend
Head station
462,6 Samoa
Underbridge
461,1 California State Route 255
Bridge over water
455,8 Mad River Slough
Unknown BSicon "ABZld"
449,8 Arcata
Non-passenger station/depot on track
447,4 Gannon
Non-passenger station/depot on track
444,6 Bracut
Non-passenger station/depot on track
441,8 Brainard
Bridge over water
438,8 Freshwater Slough
Underbridge
438,0 California State Route 255
Station on track
436,4 Eureka
Bridge over water
430,4 Elk River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
426,3 South Bay
Underbridge
424,0 U.S. Route 101
Bridge over water
418,9 Salmon Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
416,8 Tunnel 40
Station on track
415,4 Loleta
Bridge over water
414,9 Swauger Creek and Eel River Drive
Non-passenger station/depot on track
411,7 Fernbridge
Underbridge
408,4 U.S. Route 101
Station on track
407,6 Fortuna
Bridge over water
405,7 Strong Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
405,0 Rohnerville
Junction to left
402,1 Alton
Bridge over water
400,6 Van Duzen River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
396,2 Stone
Bridge over water
393,0 Nanning Creek
Underbridge
391,7 U.S. Route 101
Junction to left
391,6 Yoder
Underbridge
391,5 Wildwood Avenue
Station on track
390,8 Scotia
Non-passenger station/depot on track
387,9 Glynn
Underbridge
385,6 U.S. Route 101
Bridge over water
384,2 Stitz Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
376,8 Tunnel 39
Bridge over water
376,3 Panther Creek
Bridge over water
375,7 Shively Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
374,8 Shively
Enter and exit short tunnel
371,8 Tunnel 38
Bridge over water
369,0 Larabee Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
368,5 Larabee
Bridge over water
365,1 Weber Creek
Bridge over water
361,8 Eel River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
361,5 South Fork
Large bridge
359,8 Dyerville Loop Road
Enter and exit short tunnel
356,2 Tunnel 37
Bridge over water
350,2 Sonoma Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
347,9 Tunnel 36
Enter and exit short tunnel
346,6 Tunnel 35
Enter and exit short tunnel
345,0 Tunnel 34
Non-passenger station/depot on track
342,0 Eel Rock
Bridge over water
336,6 Brock Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
328,4 Fort Seward
Enter and exit short tunnel
321,8 Tunnel 31
Bridge over water
320,5 Fort Seward Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
317,1 Tunnel 30
Non-passenger station/depot on track
316,2 Alderpoint
Underbridge
315,4 Zenia Road
Bridge over water
312,2 Eel River
Enter and exit short tunnel
303,3 Tunnel 29
Non-passenger station/depot on track
302,3 Kekawaka
Bridge over water
301,8 Kekawaka Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
301,5 Tunnel 28
Bridge over water
300,5 Queatchumpah Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
294,9 Quarry Spur
Enter and exit short tunnel
294,0 Tunnel 27
Bridge over water
293,3 Eel River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
293,0 Island Mountain
Enter and exit short tunnel
282.8,0 Tunnel 24
Bridge over water
277,8 Bell Springs Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
276,7 Bell Springs
Enter and exit short tunnel
274,8 Tunnel 23
Bridge over water
274,4 Blue Rock Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
269,8 Spy Rock
Enter and exit short tunnel
268,5 Tunnel 22
Bridge over water
266,8 Shell Rock Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
263,4 Tunnel 21
Non-passenger station/depot on track
262,6 Nasmead
Enter and exit short tunnel
262,3 Tunnel 20
Bridge over water
256,2 Woodman Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
256,1 Tunnel 18
Non-passenger station/depot on track
255,6 Woodman
Enter and exit short tunnel
252,8 Tunnel 17
Bridge over water
249,6 Berger Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
249,0 Tunnel 16
Non-passenger station/depot on track
248,2 Dos Rios
Enter and exit short tunnel
243,6 Tunnel 15
Enter and exit short tunnel
239,3 Tunnel 14
Bridge over water
237,2 Outlet Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
234,8 Farley
Bridge over water
233,5 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
233,3 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
231,6 Outlet Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
231,4 Tunnel 14
Non-passenger station/depot on track
225,8 Longvale
Bridge over water
225,1 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
223,6 Outlet Creek
Underbridge
222,8 U.S. Route 101
Enter and exit short tunnel
221,8 Tunnel 12
Bridge over water
220,6 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
218,9 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
218,2 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
217,4 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
214,9 Outlet Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
214,7 Tunnel 11
Bridge over water
210,7 Outlet Creek
Bridge over water
207,8 Little Lake
Unknown BSicon "ABZrd"
205,0 Willits
Underbridge
200,5 U.S. Route 101
Underbridge
194,9 U.S. Route 101
Non-passenger station/depot on track
191,9 Ridge
Non-passenger station/depot on track
180,2 Laughlin
Bridge over water
177,5 Russian River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
177,2 Redwood Valley
Underbridge
174,6 California State Route 20
Bridge over water
174,6 Russian River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
173,8 Calpella
Non-passenger station/depot on track
169,0 Norlake
Bridge over water
167,4 Ackerman Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
167,1 Presswood
Underbridge
166,1 U.S. Route 101
Station on track
164,2 Ukiah
Underbridge
160,5 U.S. Route 101
Bridge over water
158,4 Robinson Creek
Station on track
142,0 Hopland
Bridge over water
141,4 Feliz Creek
Underbridge
139,6 U.S. Route 101
Enter and exit short tunnel
133,6 Tunnel 9
Enter and exit short tunnel
132,2 Tunnel 8 Squaw Rock
Bridge over water
128,4 Commiskey Creek
Enter and exit short tunnel
124,4 Tunnel 7
Enter and exit short tunnel
122,6 Tunnel 6
Underbridge
121,0 U.S. Route 101
Enter and exit short tunnel
118,8 Tunnel 5
Station on track
118,1 Cloverdale
Non-passenger station/depot on track
111,9 Asti
Non-passenger station/depot on track
105,0 Omus
Station on track
103,1 Geyserville
Non-passenger station/depot on track
96,8 Lytton
Station on track
90,6 Healdsburg, California
Bridge over water
90,0 Russian River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
89,3 Bailhache
Underbridge
88,3 U.S. Route 101
Non-passenger station/depot on track
88,0 Grant[disambiguation needed ]
Large bridge
85,8 Old Redwood Highway
Station on track
82,4 Windsor
Non-passenger station/depot on track
79,3 Shiloh
Bridge over water
77,0 Mark West
Non-passenger station/depot on track
75,4 Fulton
Junction to right
67.9 Santa Rosa
Bridge over water
67,5 Santa Rosa Creek
Underbridge
67,3 California State Route 12
Non-passenger station/depot on track
62,9 Todd
Underbridge
59,7 U.S. Route 101
Station on track
55,6 Cotati, California
Non-passenger station/depot on track
47,4 Crown
Underbridge
45,7 U.S. Route 101
Bridge over water
45,4 Petaluma Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
44,5 Park Siding
Bridge over water
44,0 Petaluma Creek
Station on track
43,4 Petaluma
Underbridge
41,9 U.S. Route 101
Bridge over water
41,3 Petaluma Creek
Non-passenger station/depot on track
31,9 Burdell
Station on track
26,3 Novato
Bridge over water
24,2 Novato Creek
Junction from right
23,1 Ignacio
Underbridge
22,9 California State Route 37
Bridge over water
22,0 Novato Creek
Bridge over water
18,1 Petaluma River
Non-passenger station/depot on track
17,9 Black Point
Bridge over water
3,6 Sonoma Creek
End station
0,0 Schellville
  • California Midland Railroad extended the Eel River and Eureka Railroad up the Van Duzen River to Carlotta, and was merged into SF&NW in 1903.
  • California Northwestern Railway formed in 1898 for Southern Pacific Railroad to assume control of the SF&NP and extend the line from Ukiah to Willits in 1902. An extension was built from Willits to Sherwood in 1904. Merged into NWP in 1907.
  • California and Northern Railway was formed by Santa Fe Railroad to build north from Eureka to Arcata in 1901, and was merged into SF&NW in 1904.
  • Cloverdale and Ukiah Railroad extended the SF&NP from Cloverdale to Ukiah in 1889.
  • Eel River and Eureka Railroad connected Humboldt Bay with the Eel River town of Fortuna in 1884, and was merged into SF&NW in 1903.
  • Fort Bragg and Southeastern Railroad formed in 1905 for Santa Fe Railroad to assume control of the isolated 24-mile (39 km) Albion River Railroad built in 1891. Merged into NWP in 1907, but never connected to the remainder of the NWP system.
  • Fulton and Guerneville Railroad constructed the 15-mile (24 km) SF&NP branch from Fulton to Guerneville in 1877.
  • Marin and Napa Railroad extended the Sonoma Valley narrow-gauge 8 miles (13 km) from Sears Point to connect with the SF&NP at Ignacio in 1888.
  • North Shore Railroad formed to assume control of the North Pacific Coast narrow-gauge in 1902. Merged into NWP in 1907.
  • Oregon and Eureka Railroad was formed in 1903 for Southern Pacific Railroad to assume control of logging lines around Arcata at the north end of Humboldt Bay.[1] Selected lines to Trinidad were merged into Northwestern Pacific in 1911.[2] The Trinidad extension reverted to Hammond Lumber Company control in 1933 and operated as logging branches of the Humboldt Northern Railway until 1948.[3]
  • Pacific Lumber Company built 7 miles (11 km) of track in 1885 to connect their mill at Scotia with the Eel River and Eureka Railroad at Alton. Branch lines were subsequently built up the Eel River; and these lines merged into SF&NW in 1903.
  • Petaluma and Haystack Railroad built from Petaluma to Haystack landing on the Petaluma River in 1864. Purchased by SF&NP in 1876.
  • San Francisco and Eureka Railway formed by Southern Pacific Railroad in 1903 to build a connection from Willits to Eureka. Merged into NWP in 1907.
  • San Francisco and San Rafael Railroad extended the SF&NP from San Rafael to Tiburon in 1884.
  • San Rafael and San Quentin Railroad narrow gauge in operation in 1879.
  • Santa Rosa, Sebastopol and Green Valley Railroad built the 6-mile (9.7 km) SF&NP branch from Santa Rosa to Sebastopol in 1890.
  • Sonoma and Santa Rosa Railroad extended the Sonoma Valley narrow-gauge from Sonoma to Glen Ellen in 1882.
  • Sonoma Valley Prismoidal Railway was a early wooden monorail built from Petaluma River landing 5 miles (8.0 km) to Schellville in 1877 and converted to the narrow-gauge Sonoma Valley Railroad a year later.
  • Sonoma Valley Railroad purchased Sonoma Valley Prismoidal Railway in 1878, converted it to a conventional 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge, and extended it into Sonoma in 1879. Extended from Sonoma to Glen Ellen by the Sonoma & Glen Ellen in 1882. Extended from Sears Point landing to rail connection at Ignacio by Marin & Napa in 1888.

History

In the late 1800s both the Southern Pacific Railroad and the Santa Fe Railroad had great interests in building lines north from San Francisco to Humboldt County to tap into the rich logging industry up there. Both railroads planned on building a line north, the Santa Fe starting with a boat connection in present-day Larkspur, California, and the Southern Pacific, starting at its interchange in American Canyon, up north through Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino and Humboldt counties to finally terminate in Eureka, California. It soon became clear though as plans went forward that only one railroad would make money in the Eel River Caynon, and so the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe entered into a joint agreement, and in 1906 merged a total of 42 railroad companies between Marin and Humboldt Bay, to make one railroad line stretching from Schellville, California, to Eureka, California. The SP controlled the southern end of the line, from Willits down south to Marin and Schellville, while the AT&SF controlled the northern end, from Willits to Eureka. There were also dozens of miles of narrow gauge trackage in Marin, controlled by SP.

The railroad service became popular; a 1911 NWP time-table shows 10 passenger trains each way, plus dozens of freights.

In 1929, the AT&ST sold its half-interest to the Southern Pacific, making the NWP a full SP subsidiary.

Passenger service boomed until the 1930s, when improved roads and highways made traveling and shipping by motor vehicle more accessible, and by 1935, both freight and passenger service slowed to crawl because of the Great Depression. It did not pick up again until World War II, when great demand for freight movement was needed. Freight service on the NWP picked up heavily again in the 1950s as a large increase in the demand for lumber came about due to the Housing Boom of the '50s.

During March 1958, all mainline passenger service was discontinued. Freight traffic remained high until the 1970s, when depletion of lumber and strong truck competition competed with the railroad, leading to less carloads.

By 1980, freight was still running in the Eel River Canyon, between Willits and Eureka, at that time the most expensive stretch of rail line to be operational and maintained in the United States.[4] The NWP's parent company Southern Pacific began looking at cutting back its unprofitable branches and subsidiary lines, and the NWP was one of them. In September 1983, the SP announced that it was shutting down the maintenance-intensive NWP line north of Willits. This led to a contentious court battle due to the fact that the SP did not properly notify the Interstate Commerce Commission of their intent to abandon the line. The line was ordered reopened by the U.S. Circuit Court in March 1984.

In 1984, the SP sold the North End, from Willits to Eureka, to Brian Whipple, who ran it as the Eureka Southern Railroad. Although Whipple tried his best, the line was bankrupt within several years. In 1989, the North Coast Railroad Authority was founded by the California Legislature under the North Coast Railroad Authority Act, to save the NWP from total abandonment.

In 1992, what was left of the Eureka Southern was sold to the NCRA, who ran it under the "North Coast Railroad" until 1995, when severe flooding of the Eel River led to a almost total washout. The North End of the NWP has not been open since.

During that time, the Golden Gate Bridge Highway and Transportation District began to purchase sections of the NWP's south end. The SP began to lease the line to the California Northern Railroad in 1993, until the entire south end was purchased by a combination of the GGBHTD and Marin and Sonoma Counties, which merged to together with the NCRA on April 30, 1996, forming complete transformation from the SP.

Using "Black Widow" GP9s and SD9s locomotives, the new NWP ran from 1996 until 1998, when money problems and management issues caused the line to nosedive. The line was shut down due to numerous washouts and unsafe portions of track. The NWP resumed survice in 2001, between Schellville and Cotati, but was shut down approximately one month later, under the first and only Emergency Order put into place by the Federal Railroad Authority.

Beginning as early as 2009, the NCRA began to rebuild and fix up the NWP between Schellville and Windsor, and in July of 2011 it resumed light freight service between those two points after many legal hurdles. Plans for the future include trains reaching Healdsburg by summer 2012, and Willits by 2014. The Eel River Canyon segment is still on the drawing board while awaiting a decision whether or not to rebuild the segment, due to extreme costs and a lack of possible business.

Route

NWP mileposts conform to Southern Pacific Railroad convention of distance from San Francisco, California:[5]

  • Milepost 40.4 - Schellville (formerly junction with Sonoma Branch)
  • Milepost 25.8 - Ignacio junction with San Rafael branch
  • Milepost 58.5 - Fulton (formerly junction with Guerneville branch)
  • Milepost 62.9 - Windsor (Northern-most operationable and open point on NWP Today)
  • Milepost 139.5 - Willits interchange with (formerly Union Lumber Company) California Western Railroad, which is still operational as a tourist line. Reconnection planned: 2014
  • Milpost 194.8 - bridge over Eel River at south entrance of Island Mountain tunnel
  • Milepost 237.7 - South Fork bridge over Eel River
  • Milepost 262.7 - Alton junction with Carlotta Branch
  • Milepost 300.5 - Samoa (formerly interchange with Hammond Lumber Company Humboldt Northern Railway)

North Coast Railroad Authority

Derailed box cars remain adjacent to Outlet Creek at milepost 152 near Longvale.

In 1992, the North Coast Railroad Authority (NCRA) purchased the Eureka Southern and leased the line to the newly-formed North Coast Railroad. The NCRA was created by state law in 1989 to preserve the Northwestern Pacific line from future abandonment. In 1996, the North Coast RR and the former "south end", owned by the Southern Pacific RR, became the "new" Northwestern Pacific Railroad under public ownership. The goals of the new Northwestern Pacific Railroad include handling more freight by rail along the Highway 101 corridor, establishing passenger excursion trains, and eventually providing regular passenger commuter service. In 1998 the railroad, which had more than 208 damaged sites along 216 mi (350 km), became the first and only railroad in the United States to be officially closed by the Federal Railroad Administration. In January 2001, the NWP was reopened between Willits and Novato, but service was temporarily discontinued in September 2001 because the operator lacked capital to continue operations. The track from Lombard to Healdsburg is owned by the SMART District; the California Northern Railroad (CFNR) has trackage rights granted from Schellville to Willits.[6]

On May 31, 2006, NCRA announced that it had selected a new operator for the line. The winning bidder was NWP, Inc., led by CEO John H. Williams who had been instrumental in setting up Caltrain service on the San Francisco Peninsula. NCRA announced approval of a 5-year contract with NWP Co. in September 2006.[7] The new NWP currently operates the line from Eureka to Schellville over the length of the original route of the NWP.

By late 2007, the NCRA was granted 500 million dollars to restore the original line from Napa to Willits. With Marin and Sonoma counties' Measure Q passing in 2008, the new SMART Rail is being planned between Larkspur and Cloverdale. Operation is expected to commence in 2014.

The NCRA and Northwestern Pacific Railroad originally planned to start regular freight service on the line in late fall 2009,but a lawsuit filed by the City of Novato pushed the date back to early 2010. Work forces began tie and ballast reconstruction from Schellville to Windsor in 2009, and electric crews have replaced and worked on many of the railroad crossings. When the freight service comes back, the North Coast Rail Authority will run trains of eight cars or fewer, and carry no hazardous materials. Reballasting and replacement of bad ties between Schellville and Windsor was completed by October 2009, with Federal Railroad Authority (FRA) inspections due to be finished in early 2011. An earlier target date in 2010 was delayed when the Federal Railroad Administration ruled NCRA's petition to reopen the line was dependent upon approval from Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART), with whom the NWP will share some trackage. This ruling was reversed in November 2010, but the two authorities still must complete a joint-operating agreement before freight service can begin. NCRA hopes to have freight service resume all the way up to Willits by the year 2020.

In June 2011, the Northwestern Pacific reopened the line and began operations over the section of track between Napa and Windsor, California. Service consists of about three trips weekly over the line. The railroad has hauled grain for dairy and poultry farms in Sonoma County, and lumber products. At Napa, the railroad has been exchanging freight with the California Northern Railroad in American Canyon.

Steam Locomotives

Number Builder Type Date Works number Notes[8]
1 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1884 7400 ex-Eel River and Eureka Railroad #2 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway #2 retired in 1916
2 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1883 7013 ex-Eel River and Eureka Railroad #1 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway #1 retired in 1920
3 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1887 8947 ex-Los Angeles County Railroad #3 then Eureka and Klamath River Railroad #6 then Oregon and Eureka Railroad #6 retired in 1923
4 Norris Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1862 1009 ex-San Francisco and San Jose Railroad #2 then San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #1 retired 1920
5 Booth 4-4-0 1873 17 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #5 scrapped 1911
6 Booth 4-4-0 1870 14 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #2 destroyed by boiler explosion 1915[9]
7 Booth 4-4-0 1870 15 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #3 retired 1920
8 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1881 5485 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #8 retired 1925
9 Grant Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1883 1664 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #9 reboilered 1917 retired 1938[10]
10 Grant Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1883 1665 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #10 reboilered 1917 scrapped 1937[11]
11 Grant Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1878 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #6 scrapped 1912
12 Grant Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1878 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #7 retired 1926[12]
13 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1875 3831 ex-Santa Fe Railroad #07 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway retired 1929
14 Grant Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1888 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #14 reboilered 1915 retired 1926[11]
15 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1878 4416 ex-New Mexico and Southern Pacific Railroad #203>#503 then Santa Fe Railroad #103>#049 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway #7 scrapped 1930
16 Pennsylvania Railroad 4-4-0 1886 1031 ex-Pennsylvania Railroad #452 then Chicago, St. Louis and Pittsburgh Railroad #452 then Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad #8298>#298>#343 then Pacific Lumber Company #3 then Eel River and Eureka Railroad#4 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway #4 retired 1930
17 Rogers Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1889 4155 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #17 scrapped 1935[13][14]
18 Rogers Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1889 4154 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #16 wrecked 1910[15]
19 Rogers Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1884 3305 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #12 reboilered 1917 scrapped 1937[16]
20 Rogers Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1884 3306 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #13 reboilered ~1916 retired ~1932[17]
21 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1904 24035 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #24 scrapped 1937[18]
22-23 American Locomotive Company 4-4-0 1908 44959-44960 scrapped 1938[19] and 1949[20][21]
51-54 American Locomotive Company 4-4-0 1914 54580-54583 scrapped 1938
99 E. Jardine 0-4-0T 1887 purchased by San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad 1898 sold 1910 North Bend Lumber Company[9]
101 Rogers Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1889 4212 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #18 scrapped 1928
102 Grant Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1888 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #15 retired 1929
103 Richmond Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1901 3304 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #20 scrapped 1935
104 Richmond Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1901 3303 ex-California Northwestern Railway #31 scrapped 1936
105 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1902 25620 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #21 scrapped 1934
106 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1902 25621 ex-California Northwestern Railway #32 then San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #25 scrapped 1934
107-108 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1904 23933 & 23951 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #22-23 scrapped 1937 & 1948[22][23]
109 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1900 18179 ex-California Northwestern Railroad #30 scrapped 1948[24]
110 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1900 17759 ex-San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad #19 scrapped 1937
111-114 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1908 44955-44958 #112 preserved California State Railroad Museum[13][25]
#114 wrecked 1946[22][26] #111 & 113 scrapped 1949 and 1947[12]
130-133 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1910 49089-49092 scrapped 1938
134-135 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1912 51536-51537 scrapped 1940
136-141 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1914 54578-54579 & 54975-54978 scrapped 1940-57[27]
142-143 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1922 55356 & 55473 scrapped 1953
170-172 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1907 30105-30106 & 31094 ex-Las Vegas and Tonopah Railroad # 4, # 5 & # 8 purchased 1918 scrapped 1946-1950[28]
178 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1906 29726 ex-Bullfrog Goldfield #13>#11 purchased 1917 scrapped 1954[29]
179 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1907 44753 ex-Las Vegas and Tonopah Railroad #12 purchased 1917 scrapped 1952
180-181 American Locomotive Company 4-6-0 1914 54979-54980 renumbered from #160-161 1918 scrapped 1952-1955
182-184 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1922 55351 & 55470-55471 # 184 destroyed in Scotia Bluffs slide 1953 - others scrapped 1955
201-202 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-6-2T 1903 22446 & 22474 ex-California Northwestern Railway #33-34 tenders added 1910 scrapped 1930-1937
225 H. K. Porter, Inc 2-4-2T 1887 905 ex-National City and Otay Railroad #5 then Fort Bragg and Southeastern Railroad #1 scrapped 1937
226 Hinkley Locomotive Works 0-6-0 1880 ex-Santa Fe Railroad #122>#2232 then Fort Bragg and Southeastern Railroad #2 scrapped 1910
227-228 American Locomotive Company 0-6-0 1910 48037-48038 scrapped 1948-1949
229-231 American Locomotive Company 0-6-0 1914 54981-54983 scrapped 1948-1950
251 Lima Locomotive Works Shay locomotive 21 September 1904 909 ex-Northwestern Redwood Company #1 then California Northwestern Railway 2nd #32; leased to Northwestern Redwood Company of Willits, California; leased to Portland, Eugene and Eastern Railroad; sold 1935 to Washington construction firm[30]
255 Heisler Heisler 1912 1254 ex-Jordan River Lumber Company #7 then Horseshoe Lumber Company #7 purchased 1922 sold Shaw Bertram Lumber Company 1924
300 Cooke Locomotive Works 2-6-0 1901 2624 ex-Southern Pacific Railroad #2140>#1714 leased 1929 retired 1934
301 Cooke Locomotive Works 2-6-0 1901 2626 ex-Southern Pacific Railroad #2142>#1716 leased 1929 retired 1934
351 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-6-0 1887 8776 ex-Eel River and Eureka Railroad #3 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway #3 renumbered from #151 1914 scrapped 1916
352 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-6-0 1886 8092 ex-Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad #65>#314 then Santa Fe Railroad #0179 then San Francisco and Northwestern Railway #5 renumbered from #152 1914 scrapped 1929
353-354 American Locomotive Company 2-6-0 1908 45284-45285 renumbered from #153-154 1914 scrapped 1935

Diesel Locomotives

Number Builder Type Date Works number Notes
1922 EMD GP9 195? Unknown Ex-Burlington Northern, to NWP 2011. In Service o/o Schellville.
2009 Railpower Genset Unknown Unknown Leased RJ Coreman; In Service out of Schellville.
70 Electro-Motive Diesel GP7 5/1953 18418 5250-10 ex-NCRR 70; ex-EUKA 70; ex-CCT 70; nee RDG 618 1996 1998 stored out of service (Eureka, CA)
2872 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 1956 22897 ? ex-NCRR 2872; ex-SP 2872 1996 1998 stored out of service (Eureka, CA)
3190 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 1955 19980 ? ex-NCRR 3190; ex-SP 3190 1996 1998 stored out of service (Eureka, CA)
3779 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 1957 22922 ? ex-NCRR 3779; ex-SP 3779 1996 1998 stored out of service (Eureka, CA)
3786 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 1957 22945 ? ex-NCRR 3786; ex-SP 3786 1996 c.1998 disposition unknown
3804 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 1957 22943 ? ex-NCRR 3804; ex-SP 3804 1996 c.1998 disposition unknown
3825 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9 4/1959 25133 5595-34 ex-SP 3825; ex-SP 3696; nee SP 5833 1996 ? to OMLX 3825; out of service (Loveland, CO)
3840 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 2/1959 25146 5596-2 ex-SP 3840; ex-SP 3654; nee TNO 450 1996 199x to OMLX 3840; to RailServe (Prentiss, AB) 3840, 2000
3844 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9 1959 25137 ? ex-SP 3844; ex-SP 3700; nee SP 5837 1996 1997 wrecked, 1997; Stored out of service (Willits, California)
3850 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9 1959 25116 ? ex-SP 3850; ex-SP 3679; nee SP 5816 1996 1997 wrecked, 1997; Stored Out of Service (Willits California
3857 Electro-Motive Diesel GP9E 1959 25139 ? ex-NCRR 3857; ex-SP 3857 1996 1998 stored out of service (Eureka, CA)
4323 Electro-Motive Diesel SD9 1954 19440 ? ex-SP 4323; ex-SP 3812; nee SP 5351 ? c.1998 disposition unknown
4324 Electro-Motive Diesel SD9 1954 19441 5322-13 ex-SP 4324; ex-SP 3813; nee SP 5352 1996 ? to OMLX 4324
4327 Electro-Motive Diesel SD9 1955 20229 ? ex-SP 4327; ex-SP 3856; nee SP 5378 1996 ? to OMLX 4327
4423 Electro-Motive Diesel SD9 1956 21297 5435-9 ex-SP 4423; ex-SP 3946; nee SP 5472 1996 ? to OMLX 4423
5305 Electro-Motive Diesel SD9 1957 22808 ? nee DRGW 5305 1996 ? to OMLX 5305
6595 Electro-Motive Diesel GP35 1964 29569 ? OMLX 6595; ex-SP 6595; nee SP 7483:1 1996 1996 to OMLX 6595, 1996; to HBRY 2502, 1997
6600 Electro-Motive Diesel GP35 1964 29705 ? OMLX 6600; ex-SP 6600; nee SP 7703 1996 1996 to OMLX 6600, 1996; to HBRY 2503, 1997

Narrow-Gauge Line

The NWP 3 ft  (914 mm)-gauge line was built as the North Pacific Coast Railroad in 1873 from a San Francisco ferry connection at Sausalito to the Russian River at Monte Rio. Rails were extended downriver to Duncans Mills in 1876, and up Austin Creek to Cazadero in 1886. This narrow-gauge line became the Shore Division of the NWP formed by Santa Fe and Southern Pacific in 1907. The standard-gauge NWP Guerneville branch was extended to Monte Rio in 1907 and the line from Monte Rio to Duncans Mills was dual-gauged in 1909. Summer tourists from San Francisco visited Russian River vacation spots via joint narrow-gauge/standard-gauge NWP "triangle" excursions until automobile travel became more popular. The southern end of the line was standard-gauged from San Francisco Bay to Point Reyes Station at the head of Tomales Bay in 1920. The line up Austin Creek to Cazadero was standard-gauged in 1926. The remaining line from Monte Rio to Point Reyes Station was dismantled in 1930.[31]

Route

Mileposts conform to Southern Pacific Railroad convention of distance from San Francisco[32]

  • Milepost 11.7 - tunnel 1
  • Milepost 20.7 - tunnel 2
  • Milepost 27 - bridge over Paper Mill Creek and highway[37]
  • Milepost 35.6 - Arroyo San Geronimo trestle[38]
  • Milepost 50.5 - bridge over Keyes Creek[40]
  • Milepost 51.9 - tunnel 3[41]
  • Milepost 53.7 - tunnel 4
  • Milepost 58.8 - Estero Americano Creek trestle
  • Milepost 61.9 - Ebabias Creek trestle
  • Milepost 62.2 - Bodega Road crossing[43][44]
  • Milepost 66.9 - Brown Creek trestle (this 142-foot (43 m) high trestle was reputedly the highest of its kind in the United States when built in 1876)[46][47]
  • Milepost 68.7 - Maquire Creek trestle
  • Milepost 70.5 - Larry Creek trestle
  • Milepost 70.8 - bridge over Dutch Bill Creek
  • Milepost 71 - tunnel 5
  • Milepost 71.6 - bridge over Dutch Bill Creek
  • Milepost 71.7 - bridge over highway

Locomotives

Number Builder Type Date Works number Notes[61][62]
82 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1876 3842 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #11 scrapped 1911
83 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1875 3722 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #3 scrapped 1913[63]
84 NPC Sausalito Shop 4-4-0 1900 1 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #20 retired 1920 scrapped 1924[64][65]
85 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1884 7249 ex-South Pacific Coast Railroad #14 wrecked[66][67]
86 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1884 7236 ex-South Pacific Coast Railroad #15 then NWP #19>#86 sold Duncan Mills Land & Lumber Company 1920 scrapped 1926[68]
87 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1880 4960 ex-South Pacific Coast Railroad #10 then NWP #10>#87 scrapped 1917[69][70]
90 Brooks Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1891 1886 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #15 operated last narrow-gauge NWP train in 1930 scrapped 1935[71][72]
91 Brooks Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1894 2421 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #16 scrapped 1935[73][74]
92 Brooks Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1891 1885 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #14 retired 1926 scrapped 1935[64][75]
93 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0 1884 7249 1924 rebuild of wrecked #85 scrapped 1935
94 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1887 8486 ex-South Pacific Coast Railroad #20 then NWP #21>#144>#94 scrapped 1935[76][77]
95 Brooks Locomotive Works 4-6-0 1899 3418 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #18 then NWP #145>#95 retired 1929 scrapped 1935[78][79]
195 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-6-0 1883 6611 ex-NPC/NS/NWP #13 scrapped 1912[80]
321 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0 1880 4974 ex-Denver and Rio Grande Railroad #44 then NS/NWP #40 scrapped 1912
322 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0 1885 7676 ex-Hancock and Calumet Railroad #2 then Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad #33 then NS/NWP #33 scrapped 1914[69]
323 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0 1885 7677 ex-Hancock and Calumet Railroad #3 then Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railroad #31 then NS/NWP #31 scrapped 1912[81]

See also

  • List of U.S. Class I railroads

Footnotes

  1. ^ Borden 1963 p.9
  2. ^ Borden 1963 p.12
  3. ^ Borden 1963 pp.10-15
  4. ^ Glionna, John M. (22 April 2001). "Light at the End of the Tunnel for a Struggling Little Railroad". Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/apr/22/news/mn-54146. Retrieved 08 October 2011. 
  5. ^ Gale & Valles (1978)
  6. ^ North Coast Railroad Authority (2009-12-12). "Public draft, environmental impact report, North Coast Railroad Authority, Russian River Division executive summary". http://www.northcoastrailroad.org/DEIR_11_09.htm. Retrieved 2009-12-12. 
  7. ^ North Coast Railroad Authority (2006-05-31). "NCRA Approves Operator Contract". http://www.northcoastrailroad.org/Media/Press%20Release-NCRA_SELECTS_OPERATOR_09142006.htm. Retrieved 2009-12-12. 
  8. ^ Stindt (1964) pp.126-127
  9. ^ a b Stindt 1974 p.44
  10. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.53 & 72
  11. ^ a b Stindt 1974 p.72
  12. ^ a b Stindt 1974 p.53
  13. ^ a b Stindt 1985 p.33
  14. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.72-73
  15. ^ Stindt 1974 p.48
  16. ^ Stindt 1974 p.52
  17. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.58 & 72
  18. ^ Stindt 1974 p.71
  19. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.70-71
  20. ^ Stindt 1985 p.28
  21. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.41 & 71
  22. ^ a b Stindt 1985 p.37
  23. ^ Stindt 1974 p.69
  24. ^ Stindt 1985 p.35
  25. ^ Stindt 1974 p.73
  26. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.52 & 59
  27. ^ Stindt 1985 pp.36-37
  28. ^ Stindt 1985 p.34
  29. ^ Stindt 1985 pp.33-35
  30. ^ Koch, Michael (1971). The Shay Locomotive Titan of the Timber. The World Press. p. 412. 
  31. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.11,13,19,26,28 & 30
  32. ^ Stindt (1978) pp.88-89
  33. ^ Stindt 1974 p.8
  34. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.32-33,45,50,69,76,99,125 & 154
  35. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.78
  36. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.48,79 & 153
  37. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.113
  38. ^ Stindt 1974 p.22
  39. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.62 & 113
  40. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.150
  41. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.34
  42. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.31
  43. ^ a b Stindt 1974 p.17
  44. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.147
  45. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.40 & 149
  46. ^ Stindt 1974 p.14
  47. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.5,36 & 96
  48. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.16 & 30-31
  49. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.40,64,93,116 & 145
  50. ^ Stindt 1974 p.39
  51. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.66 & 146
  52. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.1-4,16,53,60 & 62-63
  53. ^ Dickinson 1974 p.114
  54. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.26-27
  55. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.36 & 38
  56. ^ Stindt 1974 pp.14-15,65 & 69
  57. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.84-85,88-89 & 118
  58. ^ Stindt 1974 p.10
  59. ^ Dickinson 1974 pp.67,70,109 & 118
  60. ^ Koch, Michael (1971). The Shay Locomotive Titan of the Timber. The World Press. p. 422. 
  61. ^ Dickinson (1974) pp.132-133
  62. ^ Stindt (1974) p.78
  63. ^ Dickinson (1974) p.134
  64. ^ a b Dickinson (1974) p.129
  65. ^ Stindt (1974) p.16
  66. ^ Dickinson (1974) p.120
  67. ^ Stindt (1974) p.34
  68. ^ Dickinson (1974) pp.123 & 135
  69. ^ a b Dickinson (1974) p.135
  70. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.25 & 33
  71. ^ Dickinson (1974) pp.124
  72. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.10,16,25,35 & 39
  73. ^ Dickinson (1974) pp.6 & 135
  74. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.9,16,18,29 & 34
  75. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.3,16 & 29
  76. ^ Dickinson (1974) p.123
  77. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.25,29 & 35
  78. ^ Dickinson (1974) pp.125,129 & 136
  79. ^ Stindt (1974) pp.3,24,32 & 35
  80. ^ Dickinson (1974) p.136
  81. ^ Stindt (1974) p.33

References

  • Borden, Stanley T. (1963). Railroads of Eureka. The Western Railroader. 
  • Carranco, Lynwood (1982). Redwood Lumber Industry. San Marino, California: Golden West Books. ISBN 0-87095-084-3. 
  • Dickinson, A. Bray (1974). Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods. Corona del Mar, California: Trans-Anglo Books. ISBN 87046-010-2. 
  • Drury, George H. (1984). The Train-Watcher's Guide to North American Railroads. Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Publishing. ISBN 0-89024-061-2. 
  • Kneiss, Gilbert H. (1956). Redwood Railways. Berkeley, California: Howell-North. 
  • Lewis, Edward A. (1996). American Shortline Railway Guide (5th Edition ed.). Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Publishing. ISBN 0-89024-290-9. 
  • Kalmbach Publishing, ed (2000). The historical guide to North American railroads (2nd Edition ed.). Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Publishing. ISBN 0-89024-356-5. 
  • Robertson, Donald B. (1998). Encyclopedia of Western Railroad History - Volume IV - California. Caldwell, Idaho: The Caxton Printers. ISBN 0-87004-385-4. 
  • Sievers, Wald and Stindt, Fred A. (1969). N.W.P. Narrow Gauge. The Western Railroader. 
  • Stindt, Fred A. (1974). Trains to the Russian River. Railway & Locomotive Historical Society. 
  • Stindt, Fred A. (1978). The Northwestern Pacific Railroad: Redwood Empire Route (3rd Edition ed.). Kelseyville, California: Fred A. Stindt. ASIN: B0007F4A2M. 
  • Stindt, Fred A. (1985). The Northwestern Pacific Railroad Volume Two. Kelseyville, California: Fred A. Stindt. ISBN 0-9615465-0-6. 
  • Gale, V.J. and Valles, R.C.(Roadmasters) (1978). (untitled maintenance-of-way charts). Southern Pacific Railroad. 

External links


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