Medial compartment of thigh

Medial compartment of thigh
Medial compartment of thigh
Gray432 color.png
Cross-section through the middle of the thigh. (Medial compartment is at center right.)
Anterior Hip Muscles 2.PNG
Anterior hip muscles
Latin compartimentum femoris mediale
Gray's subject #128 471
Artery obturator artery
Nerve obturator nerve (femoral nerve for Pectineus muscle)

The medial fascial compartment of thigh contains the hip adductors.

The obturator nerve is the primary nerve supplying this compartment.

The muscles in the compartment are:

The obturator externus muscle is sometimes considered part of this group,[1][2][3] and sometimes excluded.[4] (Spatially, it is it in this location, but functionally, it is more similar to the other lateral rotator group muscles).

The pectineus is sometimes included in this group,[1][3] and sometimes excluded.[2][4] (It has the same function as the others in this group, but different innervation.)

References

  1. ^ a b Ellis, Harold; Susan Standring; Gray, Henry David (2005). Gray's anatomy: the anatomical basis of clinical practice. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone. ISBN 0-443-07168-3. 
  2. ^ a b Sauerland, Eberhardt K.; Patrick W., PhD. Tank; Tank, Patrick W. (2005). Grant's dissector. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 129. ISBN 0-7817-5484-4. 
  3. ^ a b Kyung Won, PhD. Chung (2005). Gross Anatomy (Board Review). Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 123. ISBN 0-7817-5309-0. 
  4. ^ a b "Summary of Lower Limb". http://mywebpages.comcast.net/WNOR/summarylistll.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 

External links


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