O. Henry Award

O. Henry Award

The O. Henry Award is the only yearly award given to short stories of exceptional merit. The award is named after the American master of the form, O. Henry.

The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories is an annual collection of the year's twenty best stories published in U.S. and Canadian magazines, written in English.

The award itself is called The O. Henry Award,[1] not the O. Henry Prize, though until recently there were first, second and third prize winners; the collection is called The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, and the original collection was called Prize Stories 1919: The O. Henry Memorial Awards.

Contents

History and format

The award was first presented in 1919, and is funded by the Society of Arts and Sciences.[1][2] As of 2003, the series editor chooses twenty short stories, each one an O. Henry Prize story. All stories originally written in the English language and published in an American or Canadian periodical are eligible for consideration. Three jurors are appointed annually. The jurors receive the twenty prize stories in manuscript form, with no identification of author or publication. Each juror, acting independently, chooses a short story of special interest and merit, and comments on that story.

The goal of The O. Henry Prize Stories remains to strengthen the art of the short story. Starting in 2003, The O. Henry Prize Stories is dedicated to a writer who has made a major contribution to the art of the short story. The O. Henry Prize Stories 2007 was dedicated to Sherwood Anderson, a U.S. short-story writer. Jurors for 2007 were Charles D'Ambrosio, Lily Tuck and Ursula K. Le Guin.

The current series editor for The O. Henry Prize Stories is Laura Furman.

Partnership with PEN American Center

In 2009 The O. Henry Prize Stories publisher, Anchor Books, renamed the series in partnership with the PEN American Center, producing the first PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories collection. Proceeds from the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2009 would be directed to PEN's Readers & Writers Program, which sends well-known authors to under served inner-city schools.

The selection included stories by Graham Joyce, Kristen Sundberg Lunstrum, E. V. Slate, John Burnside, Mohan Sikka, L. E. Miller, Alistair Morgan, Roger Nash, Manuel Muñoz, Caitlin Horrocks, Ha Jin, Paul Theroux, Judy Troy, Nadine Gordimer,Viet Dinh (not to be confused with conservative jurist Viet Dinh), Karen Brown (author), Marisa Silver, Paul Yoon, Andrew Sean Greer and Junot Díaz, with A. S. Byatt, Tim O'Brien and Anthony Doerr – all authors of past O. Henry Prize Stories – serving as the prize jury.[3]

In an interview for the Vintage Books and Anchor Books blog, editor Laura Furman called the collaboration with PEN a "natural partnership." [4]

Juror favorites, first-prize winners

For more information or complete lists of yearly winners, visit The O. Henry Prize Stories website.[5]

2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
  • No edition
2003
2002
2001
  • Mary Swan: "The Deep” in The Malahat Review, No. 131
2000
1999
  • Peter Baida: "A Nurse's Story” in The Gettysburg Review, Vol. 13, No. 3
1998
  • Lorrie Moore: "People Like That Are the Only People Here” in The New Yorker, January 27, 1997
1997
1996
  • Stephen King: "The Man in the Black Suit” in The New Yorker, October 31, 1994
1995
1994
1993
  • Thom Jones: "The Pugilist at Rest” in The New Yorker, December 2, 1991
1992
  • Cynthia Ozick: "Puttermesser Paired” in The New Yorker, October 8, 1990
1991
  • John Updike: "A Sandstone Farmhouse” in The New Yorker, June 11, 1990
1990
  • Leo E. Litwak: "The Eleventh Edition” in TriQuarterly, No. 74, Winter 1989
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
  • Cynthia Ozick: "Rosa” in The New Yorker, March 21, 1983
  • Gordon Lish: "For Jeromé—with Love and Kisses" in "The Antioch Review", Summer 1983, 1984
1983
1982
  • Susan Kenney: "Facing Front” in Epoch, Winter 1980
1981
1980
  • Saul Bellow: "A Silver Dish” in The New Yorker, September 25, 1978
1979
  • Gordon Weaver: "Getting Serious” in The Sewanee Review, Fall 1977
  • Anne Leaton: "The Passion of Marco Z" in Transatlantic Review, 55/56
1978
  • Woody Allen: "The Kugelmass Episode” in The New Yorker, May 2, 1977
1977
  • Shirley Hazzard: "A Long Story Short” in The New Yorker, July 26, 1976
  • Ella Leffland: "Last Courtesies” in Harper's Magazine, July 1976
1976
  • Harold Brodkey: "His Son in His Arms, in Light, Aloft” in Esquire, August 1975
1975
  • Harold Brodkey: "A Story in an Almost Classical Mode” in The New Yorker, September 17, 1973
  • Cynthia Ozick: "Usurpation (Other People's Stories)” in Esquire, May 1974
1974
  • Renata Adler: "Brownstone” in The New Yorker, January 27, 1973
1973
1972
  • John Batki: "Strange-Dreaming Charlie, Cow-Eyed Charlie” in The New Yorker, March 20, 1971
1971
  • Florence M Hecht: "Twin Bed Bridge” in The Atlantic Monthly, May 1970
1970
  • Robert Welton Hemenway: "The Girl Who Sang with the Beatles” in The New Yorker, January 11, 1969
1969
  • Bernard Malamud: "Man in the Drawer” in The Atlantic Monthly, April 1968
1968
  • Eudora Welty: "The Demonstrators” in The New Yorker, November 26, 1966
1967
1966
  • John Updike: "The Bulgarian Poetess” in The New Yorker, March 13, 1965
1965
1964
  • John Cheever: "The Embarkment for Cythera” in The New Yorker, November 3, 1962
1963
1962
1961
  • Tillie Olsen: "Tell Me a Riddle” in New World Writing, No. 16
1960
1959
1958
1957
1956
1955
1954
  • Thomas Mabry: "The Indian Feather” in The Sewanee Review
1951
  • Harris Downey: "The Hunters” in Epoch
1950
1949
1948
1947
1946
  • John Mayo Goss: "Bird Song” in The Atlantic Monthly
1945
1944
  • Irwin Shaw: "Walking Wounded” in The New Yorker
1943
1942
1941
1940
1939
1938
  • Albert Maltz: "The Happiest Man on Earth” in Harper's Magazine
1937
1936
1935
  • Kay Boyle: "The White Horses of Vienna” in Harper's Magazine
1934
  • Louis Paul: "No More Trouble for Jedwick” in Esquire
1933
1932
1931
1930
  • W. R. Burnett: "Dressing-Up” in Harper's Magazine, November 1929
  • William H. John: "Neither Jew nor Greek” in Century Magazine, August 1929
1929
1928
1927
  • Roark Bradford: "Child of God” in Harper's Magazine, April 1927
1926
1925
  • Julian Street: "Mr. Bisbee's Princess” in Redbook, May 1925
1924
  • Inez Haynes Irwin: "The Spring Flight” in McCall's, June 1924
1923
  • Edgar Valentine Smith: "Prelude” in Harper's Magazine, May 1923
1922
1921
  • Edison Marshall: "The Heart of Little Shikara” in Everybody's Magazine, January 1921
1920
1919

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Bold Type: O. Henry Award FAQ
  2. ^ Kunitz, Stanley J.; Howard Haycraft (1942). Twentieth Century Authors. New York: The H. W. Wilson Company. 
  3. ^ Itzkoff, Dave. "O. Henry Prize, PEN Announce Partnership", "The New York Times Arts Beat", 2009-04-07.
  4. ^ "Two Literary Lions Merge", "Vintage Books", 2009-04-10.
  5. ^ The O. Henry Prize Stories website

External links


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