Alexander Mogilny

Alexander Mogilny
Alexander Mogilny
Born February 18, 1969 (1969-02-18) (age 42)
Khabarovsk, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight 210 lb (95 kg; 15 st 0 lb)
Position Right wing
Shot Left
Played for USSR
CSKA Moscow (1986–1989)
NHL
Buffalo Sabres (1989–1995)
Vancouver Canucks (1995–2000)
New Jersey Devils (2000–2001)
Toronto Maple Leafs (2001–2004)
New Jersey Devils (2005–2006)
National team  Russia 
 Soviet Union
NHL Draft 89th overall, 1988
Buffalo Sabres
Playing career 1986–2006

Alexander Gennadevitch Mogilny (Russian: Александр Геннадиевич Могильный'; born February 18, 1969) is a former Russian professional ice hockey player, currently the team consultant of the KHL team Amur Khabarovsk. Mogilny was best known for his lightning quick speed and lethal wrist shot in his early years, which led to his career year of 76 goals in the 1992–93 NHL season. As his career progressed, he grew to become a selfless player and was not only known for his speed and shooting but also his vision, passing, and skilled stick-handling ability.

Mogilny's most common nickname was Alexander the Great (coined by Sabres broadcaster Rick Jeanneret), but he has since passed that down to Russian phenom Alexander Ovechkin. Ovechkin later said in an interview how he was honored to be receiving the nickname of one of his boyhood heroes. Mogilny's contract with the New Jersey Devils expired at the end of the 2006–07 season, with Mogilny not playing in a single game all season due to injury.

Contents

Playing career

In the Soviet Union, he played on a line with center Sergei Fedorov and winger Pavel Bure, a lethal combination that is best remembered as one of the most productive lines in hockey history, as all three posted spectacular numbers with their combination of speed and puck-handling skills. He represented the Soviet Union in 1988 and 1989 at the World Junior Championships, winning the Best Forward award in 1988. Mogilny was also part of the 1987 junior squad that competed in the World Championships known as the "Punch Up at Piestany" after both the Canadian and Russian juniors were disqualified after a bench clearing brawl in the gold medal match. Mogilny played for the senior Soviet Team that won a gold medal at the 1988 Winter Olympics. After the medal ceremony of the 1989 World Junior Championships, he left the Soviet team and defected to North America with the help of representatives of the Buffalo Sabres, the NHL club that had drafted him, 89th overall, a year earlier in the 1988 NHL Entry Draft. Mogilny chose the number 89 in recognition of both the year he defected and his place in the draft, wearing #89 for his entire playing career.

Mogilny tied Teemu Selänne for the most goals scored in the 1992–93 NHL season, scoring 76 goals in 77 games. In that same season he scored his 50th goal in his 46th game; however, it does not count as an official 50 goals in 50 games because his 50th goal came in his team's 53rd game.

In the National Hockey League, he played for the Buffalo Sabres, Vancouver Canucks, Toronto Maple Leafs, and the New Jersey Devils, winning the Stanley Cup in 2000 with New Jersey.

Toronto Maple Leafs

During the 2001 offseason, Mogilny signed a 4 year, $22 million contract with the Toronto Maple Leafs on July 3, 2001, and quickly became one of their top players. Despite nursing a knee injury and missing 16 games of the season, Mogilny was able to score 24 goals and 57 points to place him 2nd in team scoring. He would elevate his play during the post-season of the same year. During the 2002 Stanley Cup playoffs, with former team captain Mats Sundin injured for much of the playoffs, Mogilny stepped up his game and was instrumental in the team's run to the conference finals, scoring 8 goals, including 2 goals in each of the game 7s versus the New York Islanders and Ottawa Senators. The Leafs however, would fall in 6 games in the conference finals against the Carolina Hurricanes.

Mogilny emerged as the Leafs best player in the 2002-2003 NHL season. He became the only person to dethrone Leafs captain Mats Sundin as the team's leading scorer since his Leafs debut, beating him by 7 points in 2002–03 and finishing in the top-15 in league scoring with 79 points. In game 1 of the 2003 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mogilny recorded his first career playoff hat trick against the Philadelphia Flyers. He finished the year winning the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy for sportsmanship and gentlemanly conduct. In the 2003–04 season, he injured his hip and had to have major surgery and missed most of the season, but returned late to helped the Leafs finish with their best record in franchise history. On March 15, 2004, versus the Buffalo Sabres, Mogilny became the second Russian player in NHL history to ever to score 1000 career points in the NHL when he assisted on the game-tying goal by Gary Roberts. The Leafs would complete the comeback, after trailing 5-2 in the third period, and win 6-5 in overtime when Mogilny set up Tomas Kaberle for the game winning goal.

After Toronto

After recovering over the lockout cancelled 2004–05 season, he re-signed with New Jersey in August 2005, agreeing to US$7 million for two years. Mogilny was placed on waivers by the New Jersey Devils, and was assigned to the Albany River Rats, the Devils minor league affiliate at the time, in order to make salary cap room for Patrik Eliáš' return. His 473 career NHL goals at the time were the most ever for a player entering the AHL.

Alexander Mogilny was the first Russian player to defect from the Soviet Union in May 1989, first Non-North American to lead the league in goals scored (along with Teemu Selänne from Finland), first Russian to be named to the NHL All-Star Team, first Russian to be named captain of an NHL team, and is (as of the end of the 2008–09 season) the second all-time Russian scorer in the NHL. Mogilny was the second Russian player to score 1000 points in the NHL, reaching the milestone just a few days after former linemate Sergei Fedorov.

Awards

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1986–87 CSKA Moscow USSR 28 15 1 16 4
1987–88 CSKA Moscow USSR 39 12 8 20 14
1988–89 CSKA Moscow USSR 31 11 11 22 24
1989–90 Buffalo Sabres NHL 65 15 28 43 16 4 0 1 1 2
1990–91 Buffalo Sabres NHL 62 30 34 64 16 6 0 6 6 2
1991–92 Buffalo Sabres NHL 67 39 45 84 73 2 0 2 2 0
1992–93 Buffalo Sabres NHL 77 76 51 127 40 7 7 3 10 6
1993–94 Buffalo Sabres NHL 66 32 47 79 22 7 4 2 6 6
1994–95 Spartak Moscow IHL 1 0 1 1 0
1994–95 Buffalo Sabres NHL 44 19 28 47 36 5 3 2 5 2
1995–96 Vancouver Canucks NHL 79 55 52 107 16 6 1 8 9 8
1996–97 Vancouver Canucks NHL 76 31 42 73 18
1997–98 Vancouver Canucks NHL 51 18 27 45 36
1998–99 Vancouver Canucks NHL 59 14 31 45 58
1999–00 Vancouver Canucks NHL 47 21 17 38 16
1999–00 New Jersey Devils NHL 12 3 3 6 4 23 4 3 7 4
2000–01 New Jersey Devils NHL 75 43 40 83 43 25 5 11 16 8
2001–02 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 66 24 33 57 8 20 8 3 11 8
2002–03 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 73 33 46 79 12 6 5 2 7 4
2003–04 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 37 8 22 30 12 13 2 4 6 8
2005–06 New Jersey Devils NHL 34 12 13 25 6
2005–06 Albany River Rats AHL 19 4 10 14 17
NHL totals 990 473 559 1032 432 124 39 47 86 58

International play

Medal record
Men's ice hockey
Competitor for Soviet Union Soviet Union
Olympic Games
Gold 1988 Calgary Ice hockey
World Championship
Gold 1989 Sweden Ice hockey
World Junior Championship
Silver 1988 Soviet Union Ice hockey
Gold 1989 USA Ice hockey

Played for the Soviet Union in:

Played for Russia in:

International statistics
Year Team Event Place   GP G A Pts PIM
1987 Soviet Union WJC DSQ 6 3 2 5 4
1988 Soviet Union WJC 2 7 9 9 18 2
1988 Soviet Union Oly 1 6 3 2 5 2
1989 Soviet Union WJC 1 7 7 5 12 4
1989 Soviet Union WC 1 10 0 3 3 2
1996 Russia WCH SF 5 2 4 6 0
Junior Int'l Totals 20 19 16 35 10
Senior Int'l Totals 21 5 9 14 4

See also

  • List of NHL players with 1000 points
  • List of NHL players with 100 point seasons
  • List of Eastern Bloc defectors

External links

Preceded by
Pat LaFontaine
Buffalo Sabres captain
1993–94
Succeeded by
Pat LaFontaine
note: Mogilny served as captain, during most of the 1993–94 season, while Pat LaFontaine was injured & out of the line-up
Preceded by
Brett Hull
NHL Goal Leader
1993

(tied with Teemu Selanne)

Succeeded by
Pavel Bure
Preceded by
Ron Francis
Winner of the Lady Byng Trophy
2003
Succeeded by
Brad Richards

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Alexander Mogilny — Alexander Gennadijewitsch Mogilny (russisch Александр Геннадиевич Могильный; * 18. Februar 1969 in Chabarowsk, ehemalige Sowjetunion heute Russland) ist ein ehemaliger russischer Eishockeyspieler, der zuletzt in der Nat …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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  • Mogilny — Alexander Mogilny Alexander Gennadijewitsch Mogilny (russisch Александр Геннадиевич Могильный; * 18. Februar 1969 in Chabarowsk, ehemalige Sowjetunion heute Russland) ist ein ehemaliger russischer Eishockeyspieler, der zuletzt in der Nat …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Alexander the Great (disambiguation) — Alexander the Great, an ancient Greek king of Macedon (336 323 BC)Alexander the Great may also refer to: * Alexander (film), 2004 movie * Alexander I of Georgia, King of Georgia (1412 1442) * Alexander the Great (board game), 1971 board game *… …   Wikipedia

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