Nuclear and radiation accidents by country

Nuclear and radiation accidents by country
The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the worst nuclear accident in 25 years, displaced 50,000 households after radiation leaked into the air, soil and sea.[1]

This is a List of nuclear and radiation accidents by country.

This list only reports the proximate confirmed human deaths and does not go into detail about ecological, environmental or long term effects such as birth defects or permanent loss of habitable land.

Contents

Brazil

  • September 13, 1987 – Goiania accident. Eleven fatalities and 320 other people received serious radiation contamination.[2]

Canada

  • December 12, 1952 – The NRX accident.
  • May 24, 1958 – The NRU accident.
  • February 20, 1990 – Daniel George Maston placed a sample of heavy water into a "sport mix" drink dispenser in an industrial lunch zone.

Costa Rica

  • 1996 – Radiotherapy accident in Costa Rica. Thirteen fatalities and 114 other patients received an overdose of radiation.[3]

Greenland

India

Japan

  • March 1, 1954 – Daigo Fukuryū Maru, one fatality.
  • September 30, 1999 – Tokaimura nuclear accident, nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, two fatalities.[6]
  • August 9, 2004 – Mihama Nuclear Power Plant accident. Hot water and steam leaked from a broken pipe. The accident was the worst nuclear disaster of Japan up until that time, excluding Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Five fatalities.[6]
  • March 12, 2011 – Fukushima. Level 7 nuclear accident on the INES. Three of the reactors at Fukushima I overheated, causing meltdowns that eventually led to explosions, which released large amounts of radioactive material into the air.[7]

Mexico

  • 1962 – Radiation accident in Mexico City, four fatalities.

==Morocco==)

  • March 1984 – Radiation accident in Morocco, eight fatalities.[8]  

Panama

Soviet Union/Russia

  • September 29, 1957 – Mayak nuclear waste storage tank explosion at Chelyabinsk. Two hundred plus fatalities and this figure is a conservative estimate; 270,000 people were exposed to dangerous radiation levels. Over thirty small communities had been removed from Soviet maps between 1958 and 1991.[11] (INES level 6).[12]
  • July 4, 1961 – Soviet submarine K-19 accident. Eight fatalities and more than 30 people were over-exposed to radiation.[13]
  • May 24, 1968 – Soviet submarine K-27 accident. Nine fatalities and 83 people were injured.[10]
  • 5 October 1982 – Lost radiation source, Baku, Azerbaidjan, USSR. Five fatalities and 13 injuries.[10]
  • August 10, 1985 – Soviet submarine K-431 accident. Ten fatalities and 49 other people suffered radiation injuries.[14]
  • April 26, 1986 – Chernobyl disaster. See below in the section on Ukraine. In 1986, the Ukrainian SSR was part of the Soviet Union.
  • April 6, 1993 – accident at the Tomsk-7 Reprocessing Complex, when a tank exploded while being cleaned with nitric acid. The explosion released a cloud of radioactive gas (INES level 4).[12]

Spain

  • January 17, 1966 – 1966 Palomares B-52 crash.[15]
  • December 1990 – Radiotherapy accident in Zaragoza. Eleven fatalities and 27 other patients were injured.[13]

Thailand

  • February 2000 – Three deaths and ten injuries resulted in Samut Prakarn when a radiation-therapy unit was dismantled.[5]

Ukraine

The abandoned city of Pripyat, Ukraine with the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the distance.
  • April 26, 1986 – Chernobyl disaster. Fifty-six direct deaths (47 accident workers, and nine children with thyroid cancer), and it is estimated that there were 4,000 extra cancer deaths among the approximately 600,000 most highly exposed people.[16][17][18]  

United Kingdom

  • October 8, 1957 – Windscale fire ignites plutonium piles and contaminates surrounding dairy farms, 33 cancer deaths.[19][20][19]  

United States

See also

References

  1. ^ Tomoko Yamazaki and Shunichi Ozasa (June 27, 2011). "Fukushima Retiree Leads Anti-Nuclear Shareholders at Tepco Annual Meeting". Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-06-26/fukushima-retiree-to-lead-anti-nuclear-motion.html. 
  2. ^ The Radiological Accident in Goiania p. 2.
  3. ^ Medical management of radiation accidents pp. 299 & 303.
  4. ^ Thule Accident, January 21, 1968 TIME magazine.
  5. ^ a b Pallava Bagla. "Radiation Accident a 'Wake-Up Call' For India's Scientific Community" Science, Vol. 328, 7 May 2010, p. 679.
  6. ^ a b Benjamin K. Sovacool. A Critical Evaluation of Nuclear Power and Renewable Electricity in Asia, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Vol. 40, No. 3, August 2010, p. 399.
  7. ^ Martin Fackler (June 1, 2011). "Report Finds Japan Underestimated Tsunami Danger". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/02/world/asia/02japan.html?_r=1&ref=world. 
  8. ^ Lost Iridium-192 Source
  9. ^ Investigation of an accidental Exposure of radiotherapy patients in Panama - International Atomic Energy Agency
  10. ^ a b c d e Johnston, Robert (September 23, 2007). "Deadliest radiation accidents and other events causing radiation casualties". Database of Radiological Incidents and Related Events. http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/nuclear/radevents/radevents1.html. 
  11. ^ Samuel Upton Newtan. Nuclear War I and Other Major Nuclear Disasters of the 20th Century 2007, pp. 237–240.
  12. ^ a b Timeline: Nuclear plant accidents BBC News, 11 July 2006.
  13. ^ a b Strengthening the Safety of Radiation Sources p. 14.
  14. ^ The Worst Nuclear Disasters
  15. ^ Palomares Incident, January 17, 1966 TIME magazine.
  16. ^ "IAEA Report". In Focus: Chernobyl. http://www.iaea.org/NewsCenter/Focus/Chernobyl/. Retrieved 2008-05-31. 
  17. ^ Benjamin K. Sovacool. The costs of failure: A preliminary assessment of major energy accidents, 1907–2007, Energy Policy 36 (2008), p. 1806.
  18. ^ Benjamin K. Sovacool. A Critical Evaluation of Nuclear Power and Renewable Electricity in Asia, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Vol. 40, No. 3, August 2010, p. 396.
  19. ^ a b Benjamin K. Sovacool. A Critical Evaluation of Nuclear Power and Renewable Electricity in Asia, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Vol. 40, No. 3, August 2010, p. 393.
  20. ^ Perhaps the Worst, Not the First TIME magazine, May 12, 1986.
  21. ^ McInroy, James F. (1995), "A true measure of plutonium exposure: the human tissue analysis program at Los Alamos", Los Alamos Science 23: 235–255, http://library.lanl.gov/cgi-bin/getfile?23-11.pdf 
  22. ^ a b Ricks, Robert C. et al. (2000). "REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: Update of Accidents in the United States". International Radiation Protection Association. p. 6. http://www.irpa.net/irpa10/cdrom/00325.pdf. 
  23. ^ Stencel, Mark. "A Nuclear Nightmare in Pennsylvania", The Washington Post, March 27, 1999. Accessed July 5, 2010.

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Нужна курсовая?

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Nuclear power accidents by country — The abandoned city of Pripyat, Ukraine with the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the distance. 57 accidents have occurred since the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. Two thirds of these mishaps occurred in the US.[1] The French Atomic Energy Agency… …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear reactor accidents in the United States — According to a 2010 survey of energy accidents, there have been at least 56 accidents near nuclear reactors in the United States (defined as incidents that either resulted in the loss of human life or more than US$50,000 of property damage). The… …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency — During the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, three reactors overheated, causing meltdowns that eventually led to explosions, which released large amounts of radioactive material into the air.[1] The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency ( …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear safety — covers the actions taken to prevent nuclear and radiation accidents or to limit their consequences. This covers nuclear power plants as well as all other nuclear facilities, the transportation of nuclear materials, and the use and storage of… …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear power — Atomic Power redirects here. For the film, see Atomic Power (film). This article is about the power source. For nation states that are nuclear powers, see List of states with nuclear weapons …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear weapons and the United States — United States Nuclear program start date 21 October 1939 First nuclear weapon test 16 July 1945 …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear technology — A residential smoke detector is the most familiar piece of nuclear technology for some people Nuclear technology is technology that involves the reactions of atomic nuclei. Among the notable nuclear technologies are nuclear power, nuclear… …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear reactor — Core of CROCUS, a small nuclear reactor used for research at the EPFL in Switzerland This article is a subarticle of Nuclear power. A nuclear reactor is a device to initiate and control a sustained nuclear chain reaction. Most commonly they are… …   Wikipedia

  • Nuclear weapon — A bomb redirects here. For other uses, see A bomb (disambiguation). The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan on August 9, 1945 …   Wikipedia

  • Lists of nuclear disasters and radioactive incidents — The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, the worst nuclear accident in 25 years, displaced 50,000 households after radioactive contamination of a wide area.[1] These are lists of nuclear disasters and radioactive incidents. List of… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”