Roman Catholic Diocese of Mondovì

Roman Catholic Diocese of Mondovì

The Italian Roman Catholic Diocese of Mondovì is a Catholic diocese in the Ecclesiastical Region of Piedmont. Its 192 parishes are divided between the Province of Savona in the (civil) region Liguria and the Province of Cuneo in the (civil) region Piedmont.[1] The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Turin.

Contents

History

The town, then called Monsvici or Monteregale, was under the bishop of Asti. until 1198, when it established itself as a commune. The first bishop of Mondovì was Damiano Zavaglia; among his successors were Percivallo di Palma (1429), Amadeo Romagnano (1497), who reconstructed the cathedral (1550); Michele Ghislieri, O.P. (1550), later Pope Pius V; Cardinal Vincenzo Lauro (1566), founder of the seminary, during whose incumbency the cathedral and other churches were torn down to make room for the citadel; Giovanni Battista Isnardi (1697), who restored the episcopal palace and the church of St. Dalmazaio; Carlo Felice Sanmartino (1741), founder of the new seminary, and Giovanni Tommaso Ghilardi, O.P. (1842).

The city, at first part of the Diocese of Asti, became the seat of a bishop, suffragan of the Archbishop of Milan, but, since 1515, the Archdiocese of Turin has been its metropolitan. In 1817, the territory of Cuneo was detached from the See of Mondovì, making the diocese of Cuneo.

Its cathedral contains paintings by Giulio Romano, Cambiaso, and others. The residence of the bishop is one of the noblest episcopal palaces in Italy. In the church of la Missione there are frescoes by the Jesuit Pozzi. Outside the city is the sanctuary of the Madonna del Pilone, dating from the fourteenth century, but finished later (1730–49). The palace of the counts of San Quintino contained the first printing-office in Piedmont, and was the seat of a university (1560–1719) founded by Duke Emmanuel Philibert, the first institution of its kind in Piedmont.

Parishes

There follows a list of the 192 parishes, ordered by (civil) region, province and commune.[1]

Liguria

Province of Savona

Bardineto
S. Giovanni Battista
Bormida
S. Giorgio
Calizzano
S. Agostino
S. Maria e di S.Lorenzo
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Cengio
S. Giuseppe
S. Nicola
Santi Barbara e Giovanni Battista
Cosseria
Maria Immacolata
Mallare
S. Filippo Neri
S. Nicola
Massimino
S. Donato
Millesimo
S. Michele
Santuario di Nostra Signora del Deserto
Visitazione di Maria e di S. Antonio
Murialdo
Beata Vergine degli Angeli
S. Antonio
S. Lorenzo
Osiglia
SS. Annunziata
SS. Nome di Maria
Pallare
S. Marco
S. Margherita
Plodio
S. Andrea
Roccavignale
S. Eugenio

Piedmont

Province of Cuneo

Alto
S. Michele
Bagnasco
S. Antonio
S. Margherita
Bastia Mondovì
S. Martino
Battifollo
S. Giorgio
Beinette
Santi Giacomo e Cristoforo
Belvedere Langhe
S. Nicola
Bene Vagienna
Maria V. Assunta
Maria V. Assunta
S. Antonio
S. Nome di Maria
Bonvicino
S. Martino
Santi Giacomo e Cristoforo
Briaglia
S. Croce
Camerana
S. Antonio
SS. Annunziata
Caprauna
S. Antonino
Carrù
Maria V. Assunta
Castellino Tanaro
Maria V. Assunta
Castelnuovo di Ceva
S. Maurizio
Ceva
Maria V. Assunta
S. Bartolomeo
S. Marco
S. Siro
Santi Spirito e Antonio
Chiusa di Pesio
S. Antonino
S. Bartolomeo
S. Pietro
Cigliè
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Clavesana
S. Anna
S. Michele e Madonna della Neve
Visitazione di Maria
Dogliani
S. Lorenzo
Santi Quirico e Paolo
Farigliano
S. Giovanni Battista
Santi Pastore e Anna
Frabosa Soprana
Madonna della Neve
S. Bartolomeo
S. Giovanni Battista
Santi Giacomo e Filippo
SS. Annunziata
Frabosa Sottana
Madonna della Neve
Maria V. Assunta
S. Biagio
S. Giorgio
S. Giuseppe
Garessio
Madonna del Buon Consiglio
Maria V. Assunta
S. Antonio Da Padova
S. Bartolomeo
S. Caterina
S. Lodovico
S. Nicola
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Santuario della Madonna delle Grazie
SS. Nome di Maria
Visitazione di Maria
Igliano
S. Andrea
Lequio Tanaro
S. Michele
S. Onorato
Lesegno
S. Antonio
S. Sebastiano
Lisio
Maria V. Assunta
Magliano Alpi
Madonna del Carmine
Natività di Maria
S. Giuseppe
Margarita
S. Margherita
Marsaglia
S. Eusebio
Mombarcaro
S. Grato
S. Michele
Mombasiglio
S. Nicola
Monastero di Vasco
Maria Immacolata e S. Giovanni Battista
S. Maria Maddalena
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Monasterolo Casotto
Santi Giacomo e Giovanni
Mondovì
Maria V. Assunta
Maria V. Assunta
S. Agostino
S. Anna
S. Biagio
S. Croce
S. Donato
S. Giovanni Battista
S. Maria Maggiore
S. Nome di Maria
S. Quintino
Sacro Cuore di Gesù
Sacro Cuore Immacolato di Maria
Santi Giovanni ed Evasio
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Visitazione di Maria
Monesiglio
S. Andrea
Montaldo di Mondovì
Maria V. Assunta
S. Anna
S. Giovanni Battista
Montezemolo
S. Benedetto
Morozzo
Madonna della Neve
Natività di Maria
S. Rocco
Murazzano
S. Lorenzo
SS. Trinità
Niella Tanaro
Maria V. Assunta
S. Teobaldo
Nucetto
S. Maria Maddalena
Santi Cosma e Damiano
Ormea
Maria V. Assunta
S. Bartolomeo
S. Giovanni Battista
S. Martino
SS. Trinità
Pamparato
S. Biagio
S. Lodovico
S. Maria
Paroldo
S. Martino
Perlo
S. Michele
Peveragno
Madonna delle Grazie
S. Giovanni Battista
S. Giovenale
S. Lorenzo
S. Maria
S. Maurizio
Pianfei
S. Giovanni Battista
S. Giuseppe
Piozzo
S. Stefano
Priero
S. Antonio
Priola
Maria V. Assunta
S. Desiderio
S. Giusto
Prunetto
S. Lorenzo
Santi Giovanni e Bernardo
Roascio
Maria Immacolata
Roburent
S. Giacomo
S. Siro
SS. Trinità
Rocca Cigliè
S. Brigida
Rocca de’ Baldi
Maria V. Assunta
S. Marco
Santi Giorgio e Bartolomeo
Roccaforte Mondovì
S. Maurizio
S. Nome di Maria e S. Luca
SS. Trinità
Sale San Giovanni
S. Giovanni Battista
Sale delle Langhe
Maria V. Assunta
S. Giacomo
Saliceto
S. Lorenzo
San Michele Mondovì
S. Michele
Santi Pietro e Paolo
Sant’Albano Stura
Maria V. Assunta
S. Dalmazzo
Scagnello
S. Giovanni Battista
Torre Mondovì
Maria V. Assunta
Santi Bartolomeo e Placido
Santi Luigi e Carlo
Torresina
S. Giorgio
Trinità
S. Giovanni Battista
SS. Trinità
Vicoforte
S. Grato
Santi Donato e Giovanni
Santi Pietro e Paolo
SS. Annunziata
Villanova Mondovì
Maria V. Assunta
S. Anna
S. Caterina
S. Grato
S. Lorenzo
Viola
S. Giorgio
S. Lorenzo

Notes

  1. ^ a b chiesacattolica.it, (retrieved:2008-03-11 11:24:27 +0000)

External links

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed (1913). "Mondovi". Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company. 


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