New York City Department of Environmental Protection

New York City Department of Environmental Protection
New York City Department of Environmental Protection
NYCDEP logo.png
Agency overview
Jurisdiction New York City
Headquarters 59-17 Junction Boulevard Flushing, New York
Agency executive Carter H. Strickland, Jr., Commissioner
Parent agency New York City
Website
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep
Tallman Island plant
Rockaway plant
Sludge boat

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) manages the city’s water supply, providing more than 1.1 billion US gallons (4,200,000 m3) of water each day to more than 9 million residents throughout New York State through a complex network of nineteen reservoirs, three controlled lakes and 6,200 miles (10,000 km) of water pipes, tunnels and aqueducts. The DEP is also responsible for managing the city's combined sewer system, which carries both storm water runoff and sanitary waste, and fourteen wastewater treatment plants located throughout the city. The DEP carries out federal Clean Water Act rules and regulations, handles hazardous materials emergencies and toxic site remediation, oversees asbestos monitoring and removal, enforces the city's air and noise codes, bills and collects on city water and sewer accounts, and manages citywide water conservation programs.

Emily Lloyd was the commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection until resigning in 2008. On November 30, 2009, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg appointed Caswell F. Holloway to be the new commissioner of NYCDEP.[1] Following Holloway's appointment as the new NYC Deputy Mayor for Operations [2], Mayor Bloomberg appointed Carter H. Strickland, Jr. to be the new commissioner of NYCDEP on August 17, 2011. [3]

Other former commissioners include: Frank McArdle (1978-81), Joe McGough (1982-86), Harvey Schultz (1986-89), Albert Appleton (1990-93), Marilyn Gerber (1994-96), Joel Miele (1996-2002), and Christopher Ward (2002-04).

Contents

Facilities

Drinking water

NYCDEP manages three upstate supply systems to provide the city's drinking water: the Croton system, the Catskill system, and the Delaware system. The overall distribution system has a storage capacity of 550 billion US gallons (2.1×109 m3) and provides over 1.2 billion US gallons (4,500,000 m3) per day of high quality drinking water to more than eight million city residents and another one million users in four upstate counties bordering on the water supply system. The distribution system is made up of an extensive grid of water mains stretching approximately 6,500 miles (10,500 km).

Wastewater treatment

The city's wastewater is collected through an extensive grid of sewer pipes of various sizes and stretching over 6,600 miles (10,600 km). The Bureau of Wastewater Treatment operates 14 water pollution control plants treating and average of 1.5 billion US gallons (5,700,000 m3) of wastewater a day; 89 wastewater pump stations: 8 dewatering facilities; and 490 sewer regulators. [1] [2]

Wastewater Treatment Plants
Plant Service area Size Discharges to
26th Ward Eastern Brooklyn 85 million US gallons (320,000 m3) per day Jamaica Bay
Bowery Bay Northeast Queens 150 million US gallons (570,000 m3) per day Upper East River
Coney Island South & Central Brooklyn 110 million US gallons (420,000 m3) per day Jamaica Bay
Hunts Point Eastern Bronx 200 million US gallons (760,000 m3) per day Upper East River
Jamaica Southern Queens 100 million US gallons (380,000 m3) per day Jamaica Bay
Newtown Creek Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens 310 million US gallons (1,200,000 m3) per day East River
North River Manhattan 170 million US gallons (640,000 m3) per day Hudson River
Oakwood Beach Staten Island 39.9 million US gallons (151,000 m3) per day Lower New York Bay
Rockaway Queens 45 million US gallons (170,000 m3) per day Jamaica Bay
Owls Head Brooklyn 120 million US gallons (450,000 m3) per day Upper New York Bay
Wards Island Bronx & Manhattan 275 million US gallons (1,040,000 m3) per day Upper East River
Tallman Island Queens 80 million US gallons (300,000 m3) per day Upper East River
Port Richmond Staten Island 60 million US gallons (230,000 m3) per day Kill Van Kull
Red Hook Brooklyn & Governor's Island 60 million US gallons (230,000 m3) per day Lower East River


See also

References

  1. ^ NYCDEP. "Bureaus and Offices." Accessed 2009-04-09.
  2. ^ NYCDEP. "New York City's Wastewater Treatment System." Accessed 2009-04-03.

External links


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