Auburn High School

Auburn High School

Infobox Education in the United States
name= Auburn High School


imagesize= 130px
motto=
location= 405 S. Dean Road Auburn, Alabama, 36830
streetaddress=
city=
state=
zipcode=
country= USA
url= http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs
schoolboard=
district= Auburn City
superintendent=
principal= Cathy Long
assistant_principals=
staff= 83
type= Public
schooltype= high school
grades= 10–12
language= English
communities=
feeders=
campus= Suburban
mascot= Tigers
colors= Royal blue and white color box|#002366color box|white
founded= 1837
enrollment= 1,152
enrollment_as_of= 2007
free_label_1= Athletics
free_1= Auburn High School Tigers
free_label_2=
free_2=
free_label_3=
free_3=
bgcolor_section= #99CCFF
bgcolor_label= #99CCFF
bgcolor_value= #EEEEEE
bgcolor_address= #EEEEEE
bgcolor_url= #EEEEEE

Auburn High School is a public high school in Auburn, Alabama, United States, enrolling 1,152 students in grades 10–12. It is the only high school in the Auburn City School District. Auburn High offers technical, academic, and International Baccalaureate programs, as well as joint enrollment with Southern Union State Community College and Auburn University. Auburn High School is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. ["Auburn High School Program of Study, 2007–2008", (Auburn: Auburn High School, 2007), 2–3, 6;" [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs/administration/Student%20Handbook%202006-2007.htm Auburn High School Student Handbook, 2006–2007] ", retrieved July 13, 2007; State of Alabama Department of Education, " [http://www.alsde.edu/PublicDataReports/Default.aspx Enrollment by Ethnicity and Gender (school level) - 2007-2008] ", retrieved November 8, 2007.]

Founded in 1837, Auburn High School is the oldest public secondary school in Alabama, and is the third-oldest extant public high school in the United States south of Philadelphia. [United States Bureau of Education, "Annual report of the Commissioner of Education for the year ended 1902" (Washington: G.P.O., 1902), 1696, 1696–1879; Mollie Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain" (S.l.: s.n., 1955), 72.] From 1843 through 1888, the school was known as the Auburn Female College, offering secondary and, prior to 1870, collegiate degrees. [United States Bureau of Education, "Annual report of the Commissioner of Education for the year ended 1902"; United States Bureau of Education, "Report of the Commissioner of Education made to the Secretary of the Interior for the year 1890, with accompanying papers" (Washington: G.P.O., 1890).] From 1892 through 1908, the school was named the Auburn Female Institute, and offered collegiate programs equivalent to an associates degree. [Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 73; Auburn High School, "Auburn High School Catalogue, Session 1908–1909" (Auburn: The Auburn High School, 1908).] Auburn High became Lee County's flagship high school in 1914 as Lee County High School, and gained its present name, Auburn High School, in 1956. [Mickey Logue and Jack Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village" (Auburn: s.n., 1996), 98; "Lee County Bulletin", August 30, 1956.] The school moved to its current 36 acre (0.14 km²) campus in 1965. [Alabama, Dept. of Education, "Report of a partial survey of the Auburn City School System, 1977–78", (SG023316–23331, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History, 1978).]

Auburn High was ranked the 77th best public high school overall and 28th best non-magnet public high school in the United States by "Newsweek" in May 2006, and the second best educational value in the Southeastern United States by SchoolMatch, as reported in the "Wall Street Journal". [Barbara Kantrowitz and Pat Wingert, "America's Best High Schools, 2006", "Newsweek" 147 (May 8, 2006): 50–54. The non-magnet ranking was taken by eliminating schools from the 2006 "Newsweek" list which used selective processes for admission. Tamar Hausman, "School Expenses", "The Wall Street Journal, Southeast Journal", May 13, 1998] Auburn High School averages seven National Merit Finalists a year, and has scored among the top five percent of Alabama high schools on state-wide standardized tests each year since testing began in 1995. [J. Terry Jenkins, " [http://www.auburnalabama.org/agenda/2007/01-23-07/01-23-07-COWPresentation.pdf Auburn City Board of Education Presentation to the Auburn City Council] ", January 3, 2007, p. 4; PSK12.com, [http://www.psk12.com/rating/USthreeRsphp/STATE_AL_level_High_CountyID_0.html Ranking of High Schools in Alabama] , retrieved on April 8, 2007; Alabama State Department of Education, "State Board of Education Report Card", years 1994–1995 -- 2005–2006, records [http://www.alsde.edu/html/reports_menu.asp online] from 1998–1999 through 2005-2006. Top five percent figure from comparison of individual school scores.] Auburn High's varsity sporting teams have won 34 team state championships, and the Auburn High School Band has been rated one of the top high school concert band programs in the United States, winning the John Philip Sousa Foundation's Sudler Flag of Honor in 1987. [Data on All-sports rankings and state championships collated from the [http://www.ahsaasports.com AHSAA website] ; John Philip Sousa Foundation, " [http://www.sousafoundation.org/allProjects/sudlerflag.htm Sousa Foundation Sudler Flag of Honor] ", retrieved July 13, 2007,]

Academics

Profile

rate of 3.01%. [SchoolTree.org, " [http://alabama.schooltree.org/public/Auburn-High-000090.html Auburn High School in Auburn, Alabama - School Tree] "; Alabama State Department of Education, " [ftp://ftp.alsde.edu/documents/ReportCards/2005-2006/110/1100010.pdf State Board of Education School Report Card for 2005-2006 – Auburn High School] ".]

Auburn High was ranked the 77th best public high school overall and 28th best non-magnet public high school in the United States by "Newsweek" in May 2006 and one of the top 100 public high schools in the United States by the Associated Press based on Advanced Placement test scores. The school was rated the 125th best public high school in the United States by "US News and World Report" and the second best educational value in the Southeast by SchoolMatch, as reported in the "Wall Street Journal". [Kantrowitz and Wingert, "America's Best High Schools, 2006", 50–54. The non-magnet ranking was taken by eliminating schools from the 2006 "Newsweek" list which used selective processes for admission. Hausman, "School Expenses"; Trey Armistead, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs_band/ahs.html The Auburn High School Band - About Auburn High School] ", retrieved July 8, 2007.]

On average, seven Auburn High students earn National Merit Finalist status each year, and, in 2006, 92 students were named AP Scholars by the College Board. [J. Terry Jenkins, " [http://www.auburnalabama.org/agenda/2007/01-23-07/01-23-07-COWPresentation.pdf Auburn City Board of Education Presentation to the Auburn City Council] ".] Three Auburn High alumni have been named Fulbright Scholars, two Truman Scholars, and one alumnus a Marshall Scholar. [Auburn University, " [http://www.ocm.auburn.edu/news_releases/lowder1.html AU COLLEGE OF BUSINESS TO HOST AUBURNBANK CHAIR AS VISITING EXECUTIVE] ", retrieved November 3, 2007; University of Michigan, " [http://cgi2.www.law.umich.edu/_FacultyBioPage/facultybiopagenew.asp?ID=220 University of Michigan Faculty and Staff: Kyle D. Logue] ", retrieved November 3, 2007; Sean Selman, "Senior dies in car accident", "Auburn Plainsman", October 1, 1992; " [http://www.us.fulbrightonline.org/program_student_us.html?id=8079 US Fellows Directory: Tanisha V. Carino] ", retrieved November 2, 2007; " [http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=66509 UAB Junior Akofa Bonsi Named Truman Scholar] ", retrieved November 3, 2007; Smith College, " [http://www.smith.edu/news/2005-06/EmmaClark.html Emma Clark ’06: Fulbright Scholar, Botswana, Africa] ", retrieved November 3, 2007.] In 2007, ninety-five seniors received 190 scholarships worth US$5.54 million to 69 different colleges in 24 states. Graduates of the class of 2007 attend the University of Chicago, Columbia, Duke, Harvard, and Princeton. ["AHS scholarship winners", "Opelika-Auburn News", May 23, 2007; "Congratulations AHS scholarship winners!", "The Auburn Villager", May 17, 2007.]

Curriculum

along the classic American model. The Auburn High School curriculum includes traditional high school academic subjects, advanced academic classes, music and art, and programs in business and marketing, agriscience, industrial systems technology, and engineering. All students at Auburn High take a basic academic core including English, social studies, science, and mathematics courses. The school offers ninety–one elective courses and students may elect to major in one of six programs: Arts and Humanities; Business, Marketing and Management; Environmental and Agricultural Systems; Family and Consumer Sciences; Health Sciences; and Industrial, Manufacturing, Engineering and Communication. Systems Technology. Individual majors are offered in Performing Arts; International Studies; Military Science; Business Information Technology; Accounting; Merchandising; Power, Structural and Technical Systems; Restaurant, Food and Beverage Service; Therapeutic Services; Diagnostic Services; Maintenance, Installation and Repair; Engineering and Technology; Architecture and Construction; Printing Techniques; Visual Arts; and Communication. ["Auburn High School Program of Study, 2008–2009", (Auburn: Auburn High School, 2008), 3–4, 7–14, 21–40.]

Auburn High School awards three diploma endorsements indicating advanced study in a particular field, as well as the International Baccalaureate Diploma. [ Ibid., 5–6.] Auburn High offers 32 college-level Advanced Placement, Technical Advanced Placement, and International Baccalaureate courses for college credit. Students are also provided access to college courses at nearby Auburn University and Southern Union State Community College. [ Ibid., 15–16, 21–40. Classes offered for college credit are; Advanced Placement: AP Studio Art, French 105 (AP/IB), German 105 (AP/IB), Spanish 105 (AP/IB), AP Eleventh Grade English (AP English Language and Composition), AP Twelfth Grade English (AP English Literature and Composition), AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Statistics, AP Computer Science, AP/IB Biology, AP/IB Chemistry, AP European History, AP U.S. History, AP Economics, and AP Government; International Baccalaureate: IB Studio Art/Design, IB Art Research, French 105 (AP/IB), German 105 (AP/IB), Spanish 105 (AP/IB), IB Music Theory, IB English 11, IB English 12, IB Theatre, IB Standard Level Math, IB Higher Level Math, AP/IB Biology, AP/IB Chemistry, IB History of the Americas I, IB History of the Americas II, and IB Economics; Technical Advanced Placement: up to 15 hours college credit in Agriscience, Business/Marketing, Health Science, Pre-engineering, and Industrial Systems Technology.]

Classes at Auburn High are arranged in a combination block/alternating day schedule in which four 90-minute classes are offered each day. Some classes meet every day for one semester, while others alternate every other day for the whole year. [Auburn High School, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs/administration/Student%20Handbook%202006-2007.htm Auburn High School Student Handbook, 2006–2007] ", retrieved July 8, 2006.]

Test scores

Auburn High School has scored among the top five percent of Alabama high schools each year since state-wide standardized testing began in 1995. [PSK12.com, " [http://www.psk12.com/rating/USthreeRsphp/STATE_AL_level_High_CountyID_0.html Ranking of High Schools in Alabama] ", retrieved on April 8, 2007; Alabama State Department of Education, "State Board of Education Report Card", years 1994–1995 -- 2005–2006, records [http://www.alsde.edu/html/reports_menu.asp online] from 1998–1999 through 2005–2006. Top five percent figure from comparison of individual school scores.] As are all Alabama public high school students, Auburn High students are assessed using the Alabama High School Graduation Exam. In addition, AHS students are measured on the ACT and SAT college entrance exams, and on Advanced Placement tests.

In 2005, 58.1% of Auburn High School students took an Advanced Placement exam, compared with 7.2% of students in Alabama and 20.9% in the nation as a whole. In 2006, 58% of AHS students received a 3 or greater on an AP test, compared with 5.7% in Alabama and 14.8% nationwide. [Beverly Harvey, "More students taking advanced placement courses", "Opelika-Auburn News", February 8, 2007.]

History

Beginnings

Auburn High School was founded as a private frontier school in 1837, less than three years after the Auburn area had been opened to settlement. ["Columbus Enquirer", February 22, 1838; William W. Rogers et al., "Alabama: The History of a Deep South State" (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1994), 90–91, 138; John Peavy Wright, "Glimpses into the Past from My Grandfather's Trunk" (Alexander City, Ala.: Outlook Publishing Company, 1969), 4; Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 72.] A two-story frame school building was constructed in 1838, and in the early 1840s a separate male academy was created. [Mary Reese Frazer, "Early History of Auburn" (S.l.: s.n., 1920), 3; Ann Pearson, "Sweet Auburn! Loveliest Village of the Plain" in Alexander Nunn, ed., "Lee County and Her Forebears" (Montgomery: Herff Jones, 1983), 61; Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 72.] In 1843, the remaining school was named the "Auburn Female College". [Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 61; United States Bureau of Education, "Annual report of the Commissioner of Education for the year ended 1902" (Washington: G.P.O., 1902), 1696.]

The Auburn Female College attracted hundreds of boarding students to Auburn in the 1840s and 1850s, offering a complete secondary education to women—including ancient and modern languages, literature, mathematics, and musical arts—at the same academic level of that given to men. ["South-Western Baptist", May 3, 1855; Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 73; Minnie Clare Boyd, "Alabama in the Fifties" (New York: Columbia University Press, 1931), 138.] The school received a legislative charter as a Mason school in 1852, becoming the "Auburn Masonic Female College". ["Ratifying Incorporation of Masonic Female College", "Alabama Historical Quarterly" 18 (Summer 1956), 150–151.]

By the 1850s, the school physical plant had been expanded to three buildings: a main building, a music building, and a chapel which included the largest auditorium in eastern Alabama and a fully equipped chemistry laboratory. [Leland Cooper, "The Early History of Auburn", Thesis (Auburn: s.n., 1907), 5 ; Logue and Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village", 16; "Tuskegee Republican", April 17, 1859; Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 73; Henry Barnard, "School architecture; or Contributions to the improvement of school-houses in the United States" (New York: A. S. Barnes & Co., 1848), 332.] By 1855, the school enrolled 110 students. ["List of Colleges, Academics and Common Schools, 1855", Macon County Archives.] Faculty members included John M. Darby, a scientist who wrote his own textbooks for his students, including a " [http://books.google.com/books?vid=0FE97wVHmDZysv3jynK&id=CKAIAAAAIAAJ&printsec=titlepage Textbook of Chemistry] " and "Botany of the Southern States", which was the earliest compilation of flora in the Southern United States, and William P. Harrison, a Methodist theologian who was eventually appointed Chaplain of the United States House of Representatives. [Frazer, "Early History of Auburn", 3; Wright, "Glimpses into the Past from My Grandfather's Trunk", 32; John Darby, "Text book of Chemistry, Theoretical and Practical" (New York: A.S. Barnes and Co., 1860); John Darby, "Botany of the Southern States in two parts" (New York: A.S. Barnes and Co., 1855); Harold Lawrence, ed., "Methodist Preachers in Georgia" (Tignall, Ga.: Boyd Publishing, 1984), 234.] A significant part of the curriculum included foreign languages; courses in Greek, Latin, French, Spanish, German, and Italian were offered in 1861. ["Tallapoosa Times", January 3, 1861.] The Auburn Masonic Female College hosted speakers and debates among some of the region's greatest luminaries, most notably an 1860 debate over secession which included William Lowndes Yancey, Alexander Stephens, Benjamin Harvey Hill, and Robert Toombs. [Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 12–14.]

The Masons relinquished control of the school to a shared board of trustees with the East Alabama Male College in the late 1850s, and in the early 1860s, the school began admitting boys to the secondary division. [Cooper, "The Early History of Auburn" 5; I.M.E. Blandin, "History of Higher Education of Women in the South prior to 1860" (New York: Neale Publishing, 1909), 105.] When the American Civil War began in 1861, virtually the entire male junior and senior classes of the school, as well as much of the faculty, joined Confederate States of America military units, particularly the 37th Alabama Regiment. [Hollifield, "Auburn: Lovliest Village of the Plain", 78–79.] As the "principal teacher", W.F. Slaton, was a major in the regiment, classes in Auburn stopped for the remainder of the war. The regiment was captured at Corinth, Mississippi, and exiled to the Johnson's Island prisoner of war camp on Lake Erie. While imprisoned there, Slaton held the school's classes in the camp. Notably, the African American Union guards, who were prohibited by law from attending school in their native Wisconsin, were invited to join the classes, making Auburn High one of the first Southern schools to integrate, some 90 years before Brown v. Board. [C.C. Culpepper, " [http://www.alabama37th.com/bios-slat-stal.htm 37th Alabama Regiment of Volunteer Infantry CSA |Slaton - Stalvy] ", retrieved August 7, 2006; John Witherspoon Du Bose, "Alabama's Tragic Decade: ten years of Alabama, 1865–1874" (Birmingham: Webb Book Co., 1940); Thomas McAdory Owen, ed., "Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, 1899–1903", vol. 4 (Montgomery: Alabama Historical Society, 1904), 408; William F. Slaton, "Diary".]

When the war ended, students and teachers returned back to Auburn, but economic hardships in the aftermath of the war and Reconstruction left the school closed through the rest of the decade. [Blandin, "History of Higher Education of Women in the South prior to 1860", 106; Pearson, "Sweet Auburn! Loveliest Village of the Plain", 72, Willis Brewer, "Alabama, Her History, Resources, War Record, and Public Men: from 1540 to 1872" (Montgomery: Barrett & Brown, 1872), 316.]

From private college to public high school

Around 1870, the school reopened in the building formerly occupied by the male academy. [Blandin, "History of Higher Education of Women in the South prior to 1860", 106; Willis Brewer, "Alabama, Her History, Resources, War Record, and Public Men: from 1540 to 1872" (Montgomery: Barrett & Brown, 1872), 316; East Alabama Male College Board of Trustees, "Board Minutes", July 12–13, 1869.] The school retained the name "Auburn Female College", despite admitting both boys and girls. [Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College Board of Trustees, "Board Minutes", June 25, 1878.]

State funding for the school was minimal until the late 1870s, and the town's economic condition was poor, making it difficult to support the school. [Willis G. Clark, "History of Education in Alabama, 1702–1889" (Washington: G.P.O., 1889), 242–248; Pearson, "Sweet Auburn! Loveliest Village of the Plain", 72–73.] Nonetheless, in 1885, a separate town-funded public school system for Auburn was created, and the previously private Auburn Female College became the public "Auburn High School", although tuition was still charged. ["Acts of Alabama, 1884", Act 398; R.W. Burton, "Annual Report of Joseph A. Holifield, Pres. Bd. of Education, Auburn Dist. Alabama for Scholastic Year Ending September 30, 1886".] While this new public funding allowed the school to remain open much longer than before—200 days in 1886—enrollment was significantly lower than it was prior to the Civil War, with an 1889 report listing Auburn High School as enrolling fewer than 20 students. [United States Bureau of Education, "Report of the Commissioner of Education made to the Secretary of the Interior for the year 1890, with accompanying papers".]

In 1892, Auburn University (then the Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College) decided to admit women. Since the college only admitted women with junior standing, Auburn High added three more years of classes beyond the secondary level—equivalent to freshman and sophomore college classes—for women. With this addition, the name of the school was changed to the "Auburn Female Institute". [Auburn Female Institute, "Announcement of the Auburn Female Institute, Auburn, Alabama, 1894–95" (Opelika, Ala.: R.J. Rice, 1894), 4, 6–7, 11–12.]

In 1899, a two-story building was built for Auburn High. [Logue and Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village", 50.] In 1908, the school dropped the post-secondary program and became "Auburn High School" once more. [Auburn High School, "Auburn High School Catalogue, Session 1908–1909".] Around 1910, Auburn High fielded its first basketball team, and in 1911, its first football squad. ["Basketball Game on Friday Night", "Columbus Enquirer-Sun", March 1, 1911; "Sidney Lanier Wins Again", "The Montgomery Advertiser", November 26, 1911.]

Modern era

In 1914, Auburn High became the flagship high school for the county and was officially renamed "Lee County High School", though "Auburn High" remained the common name of the school. That same year, the school relocated from the 1899 building to a new structure on Opelika Road. [Logue and Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village", 98.]

In the period between 1910 and 1920, Auburn High changed from an academy of the classic 19th-century model, focusing on the traditional Latin course, to a comprehensive high school offering vocational and technical courses in addition to the academic offerings. [Auburn High School, "Auburn High School Catalogue, Session 1908–1909"; Alabama Cooperative Extension Service, "Alabama Cooperative Extension Service Photographs: High School Activities" (Auburn: ACES, 1925–1926); Department of Education State of Alabama, "Annual Report for the Scholastic Year Ending September 30, 1919" (Montgomery: Brown Printing Co., 1919), 105.] Auburn High added vocational courses to the curriculum in 1918, the eighth high school in the state to implement such a program. [Department of Education State of Alabama, "Annual Report for the Scholastic Year Ending September 30, 1919", 105.] Over the next two decades, Auburn High developed its modern extracurricular face, forming band, choir, drama, and other programs, as well as diversifying occupational classes. ["Opelika Daily News", November 12, 1935; Department of Education, State of Alabama, "Annual Report for the Scholastic Year Ending September 30, 1919", 104–105.] In 1925, Auburn High became one of the first high schools in the state to be accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. [Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, " [http://www.sacscasi.org/schools/Proceedings_Accredited_SACS_CASI_AL.html SACS CASI Accredited Schools] ", retrieved August 7, 2006.] A new school building was constructed in 1931, and in 1956, the school was officially renamed Auburn High School. [Logue and Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village", 152; "Lee County Bulletin", August 30, 1956.]

In 1961, the City of Auburn again created its own school system, with Auburn High as the new district's high school. In 1966, the school moved to the current campus, organized as a "Freedom of Choice" school designed to promote desegregation. In 1971, Auburn High merged with nearby Drake High to complete its integration. [Auburn High School, "Auburn High School Student Handbook, 1994–1995" (Auburn: Auburn City Schools, 1994).]

Five major additions have been made to Auburn High since the original construction in 1966, and in 2004 the school was changed from housing grades 9–12 to housing grades 10–12. In 1997, Auburn High added an International Baccalaureate program, with the first IB diplomas awarded in 1999. [International Baccalaureate Organization, " [http://www.ibo.org/school/000939/ Auburn High School] ", retrieved January 21, 2007.]

chool buildings

The following are images of buildings which have housed Auburn High School.

Auburn High School's primary fight song is "Hooray for Auburn!". The lyrics to "Hooray for Auburn!" come from a cheer that was commonly used in the mid-twentieth century. In 1961, Auburn High School band director Tommy Goff wrote music to fit those lyrics to create the current fight song. In subsequent years, the fight song was adopted by other schools, including Prattville High School and Opelika High School. At football games, "Hooray for Auburn!" is played after a touchdown. [Auburn High School Band music library, "Hooray for Auburn"; interview with Tommy Goff, 2002; Jimmy White, "Friday pep rally sends team on the road to state", "Prattville Progress", December 13, 2006; . The lyrics to "Hooray for Auburn!" fall into the public domain because they were within the United States (or the United Nations Headquarters in New York subject to Section 7 of the ) before 1964, and copyright was not renewed. See also the [http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~lesk/copyrenew.html Rutgers copyright renewal records] and [http://collections.stanford.edu/copyrightrenewals/bin/page?forward=home Stanford Copyright Renewal Database] for further information. The act of publication occurred when the music and lyrics were offered by the copyright holder to LaFayette High School in 1963.] "Glory, Glory to Ole Auburn"—often simply "Glory"—was Auburn High's fight song before "Hooray for Auburn!" was written in 1961 and is currently a secondary fight song of Auburn High. "Glory, Glory to Ole Auburn" has the tune of the chorus of the "Battle Hymn of the Republic", while the lyrics are identical to those of the University of Georgia's "Glory, Glory" but substitute the word "Auburn" for "Georgia". At football games, "Glory, Glory to Ole Auburn" is played after a successful PAT conversion. [Interview with Tommy Goff, 2002. The lyrics to "Glory, Glory to Ole Auburn" fall into the public domain because they are a rewording of the chorus of Amherst's "Marching Song of the Alumni" and Georgia's Glory, Glory both of which were published prior to 1923. See "Amherst Graduates' Quarterly" (1911), p. 15."] wikisource|We're Loyal to You, Auburn HighFor the 1955 football season, Auburn High used the Alabama Polytechnic Institute fight song "War Eagle". An earlier school song, "We're Loyal to You, Auburn High", was used from the 1920s through the 1940s. "We're Loyal to You, Auburn High" has the melody of "Illinois Loyalty". [Carolyn Jenkins, "Ephemera - Lee County High School", "Carolyn Jenkins Collection, RG 93", Auburn University Special Collections and Archives (1927).]

tudent publications

The Auburn High School yearbook is "The Tiger". "The Tiger" has been published each year since 1945, and is produced by students on the yearbook staff. [Auburn High School, "The Tiger", vol. 53, (Herff Jones, 1997).] In addition, Auburn High has a literary magazine, "The Sheet". [Auburn Rotary Club, " [http://www.auburnrotaryclub.com/programs_popups/0405/20050512.htm Auburn Rotary Club Program, May 12, 2005] ", retrieved July 22, 2007.]

The journalism classes at Auburn High print a monthly newspaper, the "AHS Free Press". The "Free Press" and its three predecessor student newspapers, the "AHS Chronicle", the "Tiger Tales", and the "Tiger News" have been published since the early 1950s. An earlier paper, the "Young Ladies' Mirror", was published by students in the 1850s. [Auburn High School, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs/jpennisi/fpindex.html AHS Free Press] ", retrieved January 21, 2007; Auburn High School, "The Tiger", vol. 50, (Herff Jones, 1994); Auburn Junior High School, " [http://ajhs75years.myevent.com/page.php?groupingID=gallery&page=2&thumbnails=TRUE&album_num=9 Auburn Junior High School - Celebrating 75 Years of Education: Photo Album 1965] ", retrieved April 7, 2007; Logue and Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village", 12.]

Starting in 2007, Auburn High students run a campus television station, known as "Tiger TV". [Auburn High School, "Auburn High School Program of Study, 2007–2008", 30.]

Notable people

The following are notable people associated with Auburn High School. If the person was an Auburn High School student, the number in parentheses indicates the year of graduation; if the person was a faculty or staff member, that person's title and years of association are included.

*John M. Darby (President, 1855–1858; Professor of Natural Science, 1855–1862) — botanist ["The Auburn Male College", "Alabama Historical Quarterly", vol. 18—1956 (1956), 168–175; Mickey Logue and Jack Simms, "Auburn, A Pictorial History of the Lovliest Village" (Norfolk: The Donning Company, 1981), 24.]
*William P. Harrison (President, 1861–1862) — theologian and author, Chaplain of the United States House of Representatives [Rossiter Johnson, "HARRISON, William Pope", "The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans", vol. V. (Boston: The Biographical Society, 1904); "The Auburn Male College", "Alabama Historical Quarterly", vol. 18—1956, 172–175; Wright, "Glimpses into the Past from my Grandfather's Trunk", 32. ]
*James R. Dowdell (1863–64) — Chief Justice, Supreme Court of Alabama [Alabama Dept. of Archives and History. "Alabama Official and Statistical Register, 1907", 43. ]
*William J. Samford (1864) — Governor of Alabama [George Hudson Smith, "The Life and Times of William J. Samford", Thesis. (1969); William F. Slaton, "Diary".]
*Leonidas Warren Payne, Jr. (1888) — academic, editor of the first anthology of Texas literature [The University of Texas, "The University of Texas Record, Volume VII" (Austin, Texas: University, 1906), 201–202.]
*William Spratling (1917) — Silversmith and artist [William Spratling, "File on Spratling: An Autobiography" (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1969).]
*Tom Sellers (1941) — Journalist, winner 1955 Pulitzer Prize ["Won Pulitzer for uncovering corruption in Alabama", "Chicago Sun-Times", February 28, 2006; "Auburn Bulletin", May 21, 1941.]
*John E. Pitts, Jr. (1942) — US Army brigadier general, director International Staff, Inter-American Defense Board [United States Air Force, " [http://www.af.mil/bios/bio.asp?bioID=6772 Biographies: BRIGADIER GENERAL JOHN E. PITTS JR.] ". Retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Mary Lou Foy (1962) — Photojournalist, Picture Editor Washington Post [Office of Alumni Affairs, Auburn University. " [http://www.aualum.org/magazine/advisory-board.html Auburn Magazine Advisory Board] ", retrieved July 8, 2007; Trey Armistead, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs_band/officers2.html Auburn High School Band - Auburn High School Band Officers] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Joe Beckwith (1973) — Major League Baseball pitcher [Kimberly Shumack, " [http://www.auburndixie.com/News/frmArticle.aspx?NEW_ID=1023 Feature Story on Joe Beckwith] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Joe Turnham (1977) — Chairman, Alabama Democratic Party [Joe Turnham, " [http://www.aladems.org/Comments/frmComment.aspx?CommentID=532 Session offered more than just punch] ", "Opelika-Auburn News", June 18, 2007, retrieved July 13, 2007; Auburn High School, "The Tiger", vol. 32, (1976).]
*Vanessa Echols (1979) — News anchor, WRDQ and WFTV, Orlando, Florida [wftv.com, " [http://www.wftv.com/station/1885292/detail.html Vanessa Echols - WFTV News Story - WFTV Orlando] ", retrieved July 13, 2007; Trey Armistead, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs_band/members/1977.html Auburn High School Band - Members 1976–77] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Ted Vives (1982) — Composer [The Los Alamos Arts Council, " [http://www.laartscouncil.org/images/AprilNewsletter.pdf Look at the Arts] ", Vol. XXXVI, No. 2 (April 2006), 2; Trey Armistead, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs_band/members/1982.html Auburn High School Band - Members 1981-82] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Man or Astro-man? (1980s) — Surf punk band [Coury Turczyn, " [http://www.popcultmag.com/obsessions/musicfeatures/manorastroman/astromen.html Space Oddities] ", "PopCult", August 17, 1995, retrieved July 13, 2007; Auburn High School, "The Tiger", vol. 42, (1986).]
*Kate Higgins (1987) — Voice actress, "Naruto"; singer [Trey Armistead, " [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs_band/members/1987.html Auburn High School Band - Members 1986-1987] ", retrieved October 5, 2007.]
*William Chen (1988) — Mathematician, winner in two 2006 World Series of Poker events [Planet Ace Gibraltar Ltd., " [http://www.pokerpages.com/players/profiles/77489/william-chen.htm William Chen - Professional Poker Player Profile] ", retrieved July 13, 2007; The Mathematical Association of America, " [http://www.unl.edu/amc/e-exams/e8-usamo/e8-1-usamoarchive/listings-ua/usamo-1987records.shtml USAMO - 1987 Student Participants] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Ace Atkins (1989) — Author, Pulitzer Prize - nominated journalist [Juan C. Ferrer, " [http://shs.starkville.k12.ms.us/mswm/MSWritersAndMusicians/writers/AtkinsAce/AtkinsAce.html Ace Atkins, Mississippi mystery writer] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Eric Harshbarger (1989) — LEGO artist [Eric C. Harshbarger, " [http://www.ericharshbarger.org/ech.html Eric C. Harshbarger] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Tracy Rocker (Defensive coordinator, 1992–1993) — NFL football player, winner of college football's Outland Trophy and Lombardi Award [HoustonNutt.com " [http://www.houstonnutt.com/tracy_rocker.htm Tracy Rocker - Assistant Coach (Defensive Line)] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Mark Spencer (1995) — President/CEO, Digium, creator of Asterisk PBX [Quentin Hardy, " [http://www.forbes.com/free_forbes/2006/0410/063.html Dial D for Disruption] ", "Forbes", April 10, 2006, retrieved July 13, 2007; Mark Spencer, " [http://www.marko.net/resume.html Resume - Mark A. Spencer] ", retrieved July 13, 2007.]
*Marcus Washington (1996) — NFL football player"Auburn High produces three unlikely NFL stars", "Columbus Ledger-Enquirer", July 1, 2006.]
*Osi Umenyiora (1999) — NFL football player
*Demarcus Ware (2001) — NFL football player
*Beachhead (fictional alumnus) — character in the series

Notes and references

External links

* [http://www.auburnschools.org/ahs/ Auburn High School]
* [http://www.auburnschools.org/ Auburn City Schools Main Page]


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