USS Oosterdijk (ID-2586)

USS Oosterdijk (ID-2586)
USS Oosterdijk (ID-2586).jpg
USS Oosterdijk, probably at the time of her inspection by the 5th Naval District on 8 April 1918, six days after commissioning.
Career (United States)
Name: USS Oosterdijk
Namesake: Previous name retained
Builder: Irvine Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Ltd., West Hartlepool, England
Completed: 1913
Acquired: 2 April 1918
Commissioned: 2 April 1918
Fate: Sunk in collision, 10 July 1918[1] or 11 July 1918[2]
Notes: In commercial service as passenger-cargo ship SS Oosterdijk 1913-1918
General characteristics
Type: Cargo ship
Tonnage: 8,251 gross tons
Displacement: 11,900 long tons (12,100 t)[3] or 17,000 long tons (17,000 t)[4]
Length: 450 ft 4 in (137.26 m)
Beam: 55 ft (17 m)
Draft: 31 ft 9 in (9.68 m)
Propulsion: Steam engine
Speed: 11.5 kn (13.2 mph; 21.3 km/h)
Complement: 107

USS Oosterdijk (ID-2586) was a United States Navy cargo ship in commission in 1918.

Contents

Construction, acquisition, and commissioning

SS Oosterdijk was built as a commercial cargo ship with passenger accommodations in 1913 at West Hartlepool, England, by Irvine Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Ltd., for the Dutch Holland America Line. On 20 March 1918, President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation declaring the American seizure of neutral ships under the right of angary — which in wartime allowed a belligerent power to use the property of a neutral country subject to full indemnification — and at Baltimore, Maryland, that day Oosterdijk became one of the first Dutch vessels so seized. She was interned at Baltimore on 21 March 1918.

The U.S. Navy took control of Oosterdijk on 2 April 1918 for use during World War I. She was assigned the Naval Registry Identification Number (Id. No.) 2586 and commissioned as USS Oosterdijk the same day with Lieutenant Commander Arthur H. Webber in command.

United States Navy service

Oosterdijk was assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service. After refitting at Baltimore and inspection by the 5th Naval District on 8 April 1918, she took on a cargo of general supplies at Baltimore. She next steamed to Norfolk, Virginia, to load naval stores, and then proceeded to New York City, where she joined a convoy destined for France. Departing in convoy on 25 April, she called at Brest, France, and then went on to discharge her general supplies and naval stores at St. Nazaire, France.

Oosterdijk departed St. Nazaire on 9 June for the return voyage to the United States and arrived Baltimore on 21 June.

Loss

Oosterdijk underwent minor repairs at Baltimore, loaded 9,000 long tons (9,100 t) of general cargo there, bunkered at Norfolk, and then departed New York City on 2 July for her second convoy transit to France, bound for St. Nazaire. During the voyage, on either 9 July,[5] 10 July,[6] or 11 July[7] she collided with the United States Army-chartered American cargo ship SS San Jacinto in the North Atlantic Ocean. Both ships were seriously damaged and forced to turn about to steam for the nearest port.

Despite the efforts of her crew to save her, Oosterdijk had to be abandoned on either 10 July[8] or 11 July[9] and sank at 15:30 that afternoon.

San Jacinto carried Oosterdijk's crew members to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Notes

  1. ^ Per the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (at http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/o3/oosterdijk.htm) and NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/172586.htm)
  2. ^ Per the Naval Historical Center Online Library of Selected Images (at http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-o/id2586.htm)
  3. ^ Per the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (at http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/o3/oosterdijk.htm) and NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/172586.htm)
  4. ^ Per the Naval Historical Center Online Library of Selected Images (at http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-o/id2586.htm)
  5. ^ Per the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (at http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/o3/oosterdijk.htm)
  6. ^ Per NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/172586.htm)
  7. ^ Per the Naval Historical Center Online Library of Selected Images (at http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-o/id2586.htm)
  8. ^ Per the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (at http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/o3/oosterdijk.htm) and NavSource Online (at http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/172586.htm)
  9. ^ Per the Naval Historical Center Online Library of Selected Images (at http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-o/id2586.htm)

References


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