Thermal conductivities of the elements (data page)

Thermal conductivities of the elements (data page)

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Thermal conductivity

Notes

* Ref. CRC: Values refer to 27 °C unless noted.
* Ref. CR2: Values refer to 300 K and a pressure of "100 kPa (1 bar)", or to the saturation vapor pressure if that is less than 100 kPa. The notation (P=0) denotes low pressure limiting values.
* Ref. LNG: Values refer to 300 K.
* Ref. WEL: Values refer to 25 °C.

References

CRC

As quoted from various sources in an online version of:
* David R. Lide (ed), "CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th Edition". CRC Press. Boca Raton, Florida, 2003; Section 12, Properties of Solids; Thermal and Physical Properties of Pure Metals / Thermal Conductivity of Crystalline Dielectrics / Thermal Conductivity of Metals and Semiconductors as a Function of Temperature

CR2

As quoted from various sources in an online version of:
* David R. Lide (ed), "CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th Edition". CRC Press. Boca Raton, Florida, 2003; Section 6, Fluid Properties; Thermal Conductivity of Gases

LNG

As quoted from this source in an online version of: J.A. Dean (ed), "Lange's Handbook of Chemistry" (15th Edition), McGraw-Hill, 1999; Section 4; Table 4.1, Electronic Configuration and Properties of the Elements
* Ho, C. Y., Powell, R. W., and Liley, P. E., "J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 3":Suppl. 1 (1974)

WEL

As quoted at http://www.webelements.com/ from these sources:
* G.W.C. Kaye and T.H. Laby in "Tables of physical and chemical constants", Longman, London, UK, 15th edition, 1993.
* D.R. Lide, (Ed.) in "Chemical Rubber Company handbook of chemistry and physics", CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, USA, 79th edition, 1998.
* J.A. Dean (ed) in "Lange's Handbook of Chemistry", McGraw-Hill, New York, USA, 14th edition, 1992.
* A.M. James and M.P. Lord in "Macmillan's Chemical and Physical Data", Macmillan, London, UK, 1992.


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