Motion that brings a question again before the assembly

Motion that brings a question again before the assembly

Contents

Restoratory Motions

Restoratory motions are a group of four to six similar motions (depending on the parliamentary authority) that do not belong in any of the three long-standing motion classes of subsidiary, privileged or incidental motions. These "restoratory" motions are quasi-main motions that restore the status quo of a question; that is, they bring a question back to its original status -- as it was prior to the last vote on it.[1]

Restoratory motions (Demeter)

Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure

In 1969, George Demeter, in his book, Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure, devised a new parliamentary term, "restoratory", for a group of six motions that restored or brought a question back before the assembly.[2] Previous to this time, various parliamentary manuals had referred to these individual motions as "unclassified," "miscellaneous," "certain other," or "specific" motions etc.

Bring a Question back motions (RONR)

Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised

Starting with the 7th edition[3] of Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, RONR grouped four similar motions under the classification name of Motions that bring a question again before the assembly, because by their adoption or by their introduction, they serve the function described by the name of the class..[4]

Restorative motions (TSC)

The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure

In its 4th edition, The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure classifies five "bring back" motions under the classification of main motions but lists them under the title of Restorative Main Motions.[5] Unlike RONR, TSC treats the motion to rescind and the motion to amend something previously adopted as two distinct motion forms under the Restorative Main Motion' title. The RONR motion to 'discharge a committee' is not used under TSC, because that manual allows a motion previously referred to committee to be withdrawn from the committee by the assembly. TSC does include the motion to ratify in this group; RONR classifies ratify as an incidental main motion.[6]

References

  1. ^ Demeter, George (1969). Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure, Blue Book, p. 48
  2. ^ Demeter, p. 152
  3. ^ Robert, Henry M. (1970). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 7th ed., p. 64
  4. ^ Robert, Henry M. (2000). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 10th ed., p. 72–74
  5. ^ Sturgis, Alice (2001). The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure, 4th ed., p. 16–17
  6. ^ RONR, p. 96

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