Skills management

Skills management

Skills Management is the practice of understanding, developing and deploying people and their skills. Well-implemented skills management should identify the skills that job roles require, the skills of individual employees, and any gap between the two.

Overview

The skills involved can be defined by the organization concerned, or by third party institutions. They are usually defined in terms of a skills framework, also known as a competency framework or skills matrix. This consists of a list of skills, and a grading system, with a definition of what it means to be at particular level for a given skill. (For an example of a mature skills framework, see the Skills Framework for the Information Age, [http://www.sfia.org.uk] , a technical IT skills framework owned by a British not-for-profit organization.)

To be most useful, skills management needs to be conducted as an ongoing process, with individuals assessing and updating their recorded skill sets regularly. These updates should occur at least as frequently as employees' regular line manager reviews, and certainly when their skill sets have changed.

Skills management "systems" record the results of this process in a database, and allow analysis of the data.

In order to perform the functions of management and to assume multiple roles, managers must be skilled. Robert Katz identified three managerial skills that are essential to successful management: technical, human, and conceptual*. Technical skill involves process or technique knowledge and proficiency. Managers use the processes, techniques and tools of a specific area. Human skill involves the ability to interact effectively with people. Managers interact and cooperate with employees. Conceptual skill involves the formulation of ideas. Managers understand abstract relationships, develop ideas, and solve problems creatively. Thus, technical skill deals with things, human skill concerns people, and conceptual skill has to do with ideas. A manager's level in the organization determines the relative importance of possessing technical, human, and conceptual skills. Top level managers need conceptual skills in order to view the organization as a whole. Conceptual skills are used in planning and dealing with ideas and abstractions. Supervisors need technical skills to manage their area of specialty. All levels of management need human skills in order to interact and communicate with other people successfully. As the pace of change accelerates and diverse technologies converge, new global industries are being created (for example, telecommunications). Technological change alters the fundamental structure of firms and calls for new organizational approaches and management skills.

Employees who benefit

Skills management provides a structured approach to developing individual and collective skills, and gives a common vocabulary for discussing skills. As well as this general benefit, three groups of employees receive specific benefits from skills management.

Individual Employees

As a result of skills management, employees should be aware of the skills their job requires, and any skills gaps that they have. Depending on their employer, it may also result in a personal development plan (PDP) of training to bridge some or all of those skills gaps over a given period.

Line Managers

Skills management enables managers to know the skill strengths and weaknesses of employees reporting to them. It can also enable them to search for employees with particular skill sets (e.g. to fill a role on a particular project).

Organization Executives

A rolled-up view of skills and skills gaps across an organization can enable its executives to see areas of skill strength and weakness. This enables them to plan for the future against the current and future abilities of staff, as well as to prioritise areas for skills development.

ee also

* Knowledge management
* Competence


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Management — in all business and organizational activities is the act of getting people together to accomplish desired goals and objectives using available resources efficiently and effectively. Management comprises planning, organizing, staffing, leading or… …   Wikipedia

  • Management effectiveness — In the management, the ultimate measure of management s performance is the metric of management effectiveness which includes: Conflict management, or how well management is able to utilize confrontation and collaboration skills; management s… …   Wikipedia

  • Skills based routing — (SBR), or Skills based call routing, is a call assignment strategy used in call centres to assign incoming calls to the most suitable agent, rather than simply choosing the next available agent. It is an enhancement to the Automatic Call… …   Wikipedia

  • Skills for Care — is the strategic body for workforce development in adult social care in England.Skills for Care’s vision is * To put employers in the driving seat on social care workforce issues * To create a trained and qualified workforce providing high… …   Wikipedia

  • Management development — is best described as the process from which managers learn and improve their skills not only to benefit themselves but also their employing organizations.[1] In organisational development (OD), the effectiveness of management is recognised as one …   Wikipedia

  • Management Development Institute — Motto Yogah Karmasu Kaushalam (Sanskrit) from the Gita 2:50 Motto in English Pefection in action is Yoga An act becomes perfect when you do it with all joy and without expecting anything in return …   Wikipedia

  • Management Development Institute of Singapore — Established 1956 Type Private President Dr. Eric Kuan Choon Hock Location 501 Stirling Road, Singapore …   Wikipedia

  • Management Development — is best described as the process from which managers learn and improve their skills not only to benefit themselves but also their employing organisations. [Cannell.M. Management Development factsheet. London. CIPD (November 2004 rev 2007) ] In… …   Wikipedia

  • Management consulting — indicates both the industry and practice of helping organizations improve their performance primarily through the analysis of existing organizational problems and development of plans for improvement. Organizations hire the services of management …   Wikipedia

  • Management styles — are characteristic ways of making decisions and relating to subordinates.This idea was further developed by Robert Tannenbaum and Warren H. Schmidt (1958, 1973), who argued that the style of leadership is dependent upon the prevailing… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”