Fluid pressure

Fluid pressure

Fluid pressure is the pressure at some point within a fluid, such as water or air.

Fluid pressure occurs in one of two situations:
#an open condition, such as the ocean, a swimming pool, or the atmosphere; or
#a closed condition, such as a water line or a gas line.

Pressure in open conditions usually can be approximated as the pressure in "static" or non-moving conditions (even in the ocean where there are waves and currents), because the motions create only negligible changes in the pressure. Such conditions conform with principles of fluid statics. The pressure at any given point of a non-moving (static) fluid is called the hydrostatic pressure.

Closed bodies of fluid are either "static," when the fluid is not moving, or "dynamic," when the fluid can move as in either a pipe or by compressing an air gap in a closed container. The pressure in closed conditions conforms with the principles of fluid dynamics.

The concepts of fluid pressure are predominantly attributed to the discoveries of Blaise Pascal and Daniel Bernoulli.

Applications

* Artesian well
* Blood pressure
* Hydraulic head
* Plant cell stability
* Pythagorean cup

ee also

* Fluid statics
* Hydraulics
* Hydrostatic pressure


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fluid pressure — Pressure Pres sure (?; 138), n. [OF., fr. L. pressura, fr. premere. See 4th {Press}.] 1. The act of pressing, or the condition of being pressed; compression; a squeezing; a crushing; as, a pressure of the hand. [1913 Webster] 2. A contrasting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fluid pressure — Physics, Mech. the pressure exerted by a fluid, directly proportional to the specific gravity at any point and to the height of the fluid above the point. [1835 45] * * * fluid pressure, the pressure exerted by a confined fluid in static… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fluid pressure — Physics, Mech. the pressure exerted by a fluid, directly proportional to the specific gravity at any point and to the height of the fluid above the point. [1835 45] * * * …   Universalium

  • fluid pressure — /ˈfluəd prɛʃə/ (say floohuhd preshuh) noun the pressure exerted by a fluid, equal in all directions around a point and acting in a perpendicular direction to any surface …  

  • Pressure head — is a term used in fluid mechanics to represent the internal energy of a fluid due to the pressure exerted on its container. It may also be called static pressure head or simply static head (but not static head pressure). It is mathematically… …   Wikipedia

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  • Fluid statics — (also called hydrostatics) is the science of fluids at rest, and is a sub field within fluid mechanics. The term usually refers to the mathematical treatment of the subject. It embraces the study of the conditions under which fluids are at rest… …   Wikipedia

  • Pressure — Pres sure (?; 138), n. [OF., fr. L. pressura, fr. premere. See 4th {Press}.] 1. The act of pressing, or the condition of being pressed; compression; a squeezing; a crushing; as, a pressure of the hand. [1913 Webster] 2. A contrasting force or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pressure gauge — Pressure Pres sure (?; 138), n. [OF., fr. L. pressura, fr. premere. See 4th {Press}.] 1. The act of pressing, or the condition of being pressed; compression; a squeezing; a crushing; as, a pressure of the hand. [1913 Webster] 2. A contrasting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pressure — This article is about pressure in the physical sciences. For other uses, see Pressure (disambiguation). Pressure as exerted by particle collisions inside a closed container …   Wikipedia

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