Sonnet 93

Sonnet 93

Sonnet|93
So shall I live, supposing thou art true,
Like a deceived husband; so love's face
May still seem love to me, though altered new;
Thy looks with me, thy heart in other place:
For there can live no hatred in thine eye,
Therefore in that I cannot know thy change.
In many's looks, the false heart's history
Is writ in moods, and frowns, and wrinkles strange.
But heaven in thy creation did decree
That in thy face sweet love should ever dwell;
Whate'er thy thoughts, or thy heart's workings be,
Thy looks should nothing thence, but sweetness tell.
How like Eve's apple doth thy beauty grow,
If thy sweet virtue answer not thy show!

Sonnet 93 is one of 154 sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare. It's a member of the Fair Youth sequence, in which the poet expresses his love towards a young man.

ynopsis

Contrary to the previous sonnet, Sonnet 92, in which Shakespeare tries to question the young man's morals and character, he may now be fluctuant in his character without his own knowledge. Shakespeare also goes ahead and basically refutes what he had said in the previous sonnet, now saynig that the young man is a good person with upstanding morals. He goes on to say, “For there can live no hatred in thine eye.” He is now refuting his previous statements and stating that the boy can not have bad morals or vice.

In the first quatrain of the sonnet, the poet says, “So shall I live, supposing thou art true”, illustrating the initial doubt in the young man's moral character. Gradually, he starts to reason that the youth's beauty outweighs his moral flaws, a sort of superficial and narcisstic belief that the poet had previously criticized in earlier sonnets. The poet goes on to speak about the young man's facial beauty, without considering the virtue of the young man. Shakespeare acknowledges this possibility by saying, “How like Eve’s apple doth thy beauty grow", showing a connection to Adam and Eve, and how Eve's external beauty was countered by her internal moral lack of character.

ee also

Shakespeare's sonnets

External links

* [http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/LitNote/id-169,pageNum-96.html Cliffsnotes analysis of Sonnet 93]


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • SONNET — SONNE Poème à forme fixe de quatorze vers répartis en quatre strophes, le sonnet tient dans la littérature européenne, et notamment française, une place extrêmement importante. On sait qu’«un sonnet sans défaut vaut seul un long poème» (Boileau) …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Sonnet 18 — sonnet|18 Shall I compare thee to a summer s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer s lease hath all too short a date; Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 55 — Sonnet|55 Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme; But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone besmear d with sluttish time. When wasteful war shall statues overturn, And broils… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 1 — sonnet|1 From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty s rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed st thy light st… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 30 — Sonnet|30 When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past, I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, And with old woes new wail my dear time s waste: Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow, For precious… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 63 — Sonnet|63 Against my love shall be, as I am now, With Time s injurious hand crush d and o er worn; When hours have drain d his blood and fill d his brow With lines and wrinkles; when his youthful morn Hath travell d on to age s steepy night, And… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 2 — sonnet|2 When forty winters shall besiege thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty s field, Thy youth s proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter d weed, of small worth held: Then being ask d where all thy beauty lies, Where all the… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 29 — Sonnet|29 When, in disgrace with fortune and men s eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 13 — Sonnet|13 O! that you were your self; but, love, you are No longer yours, than you your self here live: Against this coming end you should prepare, And your sweet semblance to some other give: So should that beauty which you hold in lease Find no …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 3 — Sonnet|3 Look in thy glass, and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time that face should form another; Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest, Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother. For where is she so fair whose unear d womb… …   Wikipedia

  • Sonnet 60 — Sonnet|60 Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend. Nativity, once in the main of light, Crawls to maturity,… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”