List of quotes from Shakespeare in Brave New World

List of quotes from Shakespeare in Brave New World

The list of quotes from Shakespeare in "Brave New World" refers to the large number of quotations in the 1932 dystopian novel by Aldous Huxley, "Brave New World", which are derived from the plays and other works of William Shakespeare.

List of Quotes

Chapter 7

Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
"The multitudinous seas in incarnadine,"
Making the green one red.
"Macbeth" (II, ii)

Chapter 8

"Nay, but to live
"In the rank sweat of an enseamed bed,
"Stew’d in corruption, honeying and making love
"Over the nasty sty…
"Hamlet" (III, iv)

"When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage,
"Or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed…
"Hamlet" (III, iii)

"To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
"Macbeth" (V, v)

"O, wonder!
"How many goodly creatures are there here!
"How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
"That has such people in't!
"The Tempest" (V, i)

Chapter 9

"Her eyes, her hair, her cheek, her gait, her voice,
"Handlest in thy discourse, O, that her hand,
"In whose comparison all whites are ink,
"Writing their own reproach, to whose soft seizure
"The cygnet's down is harsh…
"Troilus and Cressida" (I, i)

"On the white wonder of dear Juliet's hand may seize
"And steal immortal blessing from her lips,
"Who even in pure and vestal modesty,
"Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin.
"Romeo and Juliet" (III, iii)

Chapter 11

"Eternity was in our lips and eyes.
"Antony and Cleopatra" (I, iii)

Chapter 12

"O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
"It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
"Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear;
"Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear...
"Romeo and Juliet" (I, v)

"Let the bird of loudest lay,
"On the sole Arabian tree,
"Herald sad and trumpet be,
"The Phoenix and the Turtle"

"Property was thus appalled,
"That the self was not the same;
"Single nature's double name
"Neither two nor one was called.
"Reason, in itself confounded,
"Saw division grow together,
"The Phoenix and the Turtle"

"Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
"That sees into the bottom of my grief?
"O, sweet my mother, cast me not away!
"Delay this marriage for a month, a week;
"Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
"In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.
"Romeo and Juliet" (III, v)

Chapter 13

"Admired Miranda!
"Indeed the top of admiration! worth
"What's dearest to the world!" Full many a lady
I have eyed with best regard and many a time
The harmony of their tongues hath into bondage
Brought my too diligent ear: for several virtues
Have I liked several women; never any
With so fun soul, but some defect in her
Did quarrel with the noblest grace she owed
And put it to the foil: but you, "O you, "
"So perfect and so peerless, are created
"Of every creature's best!
"The Tempest" (III, i)

"There be some sports are painful, and their labour
"Delight in them sets off: some kinds of baseness
"Are nobly undergone" and most poor matters
Point to rich ends.
"The Tempest" (III, i)

"Outliving beauty's outward, with a mind
"That doth renew swifter than blood decays!
"Troilus and Cressida" (III, ii)

"If thou dost break her virgin-knot before
"All sanctimonious ceremonies may
"With full and holy rite" be minister'd,
No sweet aspersion shall the heavens let fall
"The Tempest" (IV, i)

"With such love as 'tis now, the murkiest den,
"The most opportune place, the strong'st suggestion.
"Our worser genius can, shall never melt
"Mine honour into lust, to take away
"The edge of that day's celebration
"The Tempest" (IV, i)

"Make soft thy trenchant sword; for those milk-paps,
"That through the window-bars bore at men's eyes,
"Are not within the leaf of pity writ,
"Timon of Athens" (IV, iii)

Look thou be true; do not give dalliance
"Too much the rein: the strongest oaths are straw
"To the fire i' the blood: be more abstemious,
"Or else, good night your vow!
"The Tempest" (IV, i)

"Impudent strumpet!
"Othello" (IV, ii)

"The wren goes to 't, and the small gilded fly
"Does lecher in my sight...
"The fitchew, nor the soiled horse, goes to 't
"With a more riotous appetite.
"Down from the waist they are Centaurs,
"Though women all above:
"But to the girdle do the gods inherit,
"Beneath is all the fiends';
"There's hell, there's darkness, there's the
"sulphurous pit,
"Burning, scalding, stench, consumption; fie,
"fie, fie! pah, pah! Give me an ounce of civet,
"good apothecary, to sweeten my imagination:
"King Lear" (IV, vi)

O, ay; as summer flies are in the shambles,
"That quicken even with blowing. O thou weed,
"Who art so lovely fair and smell'st so sweet
"That the sense aches at thee, would thou hadst
"ne'er been born!
"Othello" (IV, ii)

"Was this fair paper, this most goodly book,
"Made to write 'whore' upon? What committed!...
"Heaven stops the nose at it and the moon winks,
"Othello" (IV, ii)

"If I do not usurp myself, I am.
"Twelfth Night" (I, v)

Chapters 15

O, wonder!
"How many goodly creatures are there here! "
"How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, "
That has such people in't!
"The Tempest" (V, i)

"Lend me your ears "
"Julius Caesar" (III, ii)

Chapter 16

"Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments"
"Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices"
"The Tempest" (III, ii)

"Goats and monkeys!"
"Othello" (IV, i)

And then is heard no more: it is a tale
" Told by an idiot", full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
"Macbeth" (V, v)

Chapter 17

"I Pandulph, of fair Milan cardinal "
"King John" (III, i)

"The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices "
"Make instruments to plague us:"
"The dark and vicious place where thee he got"
"Cost him his eyes."
"Thou hast spoken right, 'tis true;"
"The wheel is come full circle: I am here."
"King Lear" (V, iii)

"But value dwells not in particular will;
"It holds his estimate and dignity
"As well wherein 'tis precious of itself
"As in the prizer:
"Troilus and Cressida" (II, ii)

"If after every tempest come such calms,
" May the winds blow till they have waken'd death
"Othello" (II, i)

"Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
"The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
"Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
"and by opposing end them?
"Hamlet" (III, i)

"Exposing what is mortal and unsure
"To all that fortune, death and danger dare,
"Even for an eggshell.
"Hamlet" (IV, iv)

Chapter 18

"Eternity was in our lips and eyes"
"Antony and Cleopatra" (I, iii)

"And all our yesterdays have lighted fools"
"The way to dusty death."
"Macbeth" (V, v)

For if the sun breed maggots in a dead dog, being "a"
god("good") "kissing carrion",
"Hamlet" (II,ii)

"As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods."
"They kill us for their sport."
"King Lear" (IV, i)

"To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;"
"For in that sleep of death what dreams may come"
"Hamlet" (III, i)

List of Plays

"Antony and Cleopatra"

Eternity was in our lips and eyes
Chapter 11 & 18, "Antony and Cleopatra" (I, iii)

"Hamlet"

Nay, but to live
In the rank sweat of an enseamed bed,
Stew’d in corruption, honeying and making love
Over the nasty sty…
Chapter 8, Page 131 "Hamlet" (III, iv)

When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage,
Or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed…
Chapter 8, Page 133 "Hamlet" (III, iii)

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
and by opposing end them?
Chapter 17, Page 238 "Hamlet" (III, i)

Exposing what is mortal and unsure
To all that fortune, death and danger dare,
Even for an eggshell…
Chapter 17, Page 239 "Hamlet" (IV, iv)

To sleep: perchance to dream
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come?
Chapter 18, Page 254 "Hamlet" (III, i)

A good kissing carrion
Chapter 18, page 254 "Hamlet" (II,ii)

"King John"

I Pandulph, of fair Milan cardinal
Chapter 17, pg 237 "King John" (III, i)

"King Lear"

The wren goes to 't, and the small gilded fly
Does lecher in my sight.
Chapter 13, Page 195 "King Lear" (IV, vi)

The fitchew, nor the soiled horse, goes to't
With a more riotous appetite.
Down from the waist they are Centaurs,
Though women all above: But to the girdle do the gods inherit,
Beneath is all the fiends';
There's hell, there's darkness, there's the sulphurous pit,
Burning, scalding, stench, consumption; fie,
fie, fie! pah, pah!
Give me an ounce of civet,
good apothecary, to sweeten my imagination:
Chapter 13, Page 195 "King Lear" (IV, vi)

The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us:
The dark and vicious place where thee he got
Cost him his eyes.
Thou hast spoken right, 'tis true;
The wheel is come full circle: I am here.
Chapter 17, Page 235 "King Lear" (V, iii)

As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods.
They kill us for their sport.
Chapter 18, Page 254 "King Lear" (IV, i)

"Macbeth"

The multitudinous seas in incarnadine,
Chapter 7, Page 117 "Macbeth" (II, ii)

To-morrow and to-morrow and to-morrow...
Chapter 8, Page 136 "Macbeth" (V, v)

...And all our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death...
Chapter 18, Page 261 "Macbeth" (V, v)

...told by an idiot
Chapter 16, Page 227 "Macbeth" (V, v)

"Othello"

Goats and monkeys!
"Othello" (IV, i)

O thou weed,
Who art so lovely fair and smell'st so sweet
That the sense aches at thee
Chapter 13, pg 200 "Othello" (IV, ii)

Was this fair paper, this most goodly book,
Made to write 'whore' upon?
Chapter 13, pg 200 "Othello" (IV, ii)

If after every tempest come such calms,
May the winds blow till they have waken'd death
Chapter 17, pg 238 "Othello" (II, i)

Impudent strumpet!
Chapter 13, pg 194 "Othello" (IV, ii)

"The Phoenix and the Turtle"

Let the bird of loudest lay,
On the sole Arabian tree,
Herald sad and trumpet be,
Chapter 12, pg 186 "The Phoenix and the Turtle"

Property was thus appalled,
That the self was not the same;
Single nature's double name
Neither two nor one was called.
Reason, in itself confounded,
Saw division grow together,
Chapter 12, pg 186 "The Phoenix and the Turtle"

"Romeo and Juliet"

On the white wonder of dear Juliet's hand may seize
And steal immortal blessing from her lips,
Who even in pure and vestal modesty,
Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin.
pg 146 "Romeo and Juliet" (III, iii)

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear...
pg 181 "Romeo and Juliet" (I, v)
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
O, sweet my mother, cast me not away!
Delay this marriage for a month, a week;
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed
In that dim monument where Tybalt lies.
Chapter 12, pg 187 "Romeo and Juliet" (III, v)

"The Tempest"

There be some sports are painful...
...their labor delight in them sets off...
...some kinds of baseness are nobly undergone.
Chapter 12, pg 190 "The Tempest" (III, i)

If thou dost break her virgin-knot before
All sanctimonious ceremonies may
With full and holy rite…
Chapter 12, pg 191 "The Tempest" (IV, i)

How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is!
O brave new world,
That has such people in it!
Chapters 8 & 15 "The Tempest" (V, i)

Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices
Chapter 16, pg 224 "The Tempest" (III, ii)

Admired Miranda!
Indeed the top of admiration! worth
What's dearest to the world! (...)O you, so perfect and so peerless are createdof every creature's best. =

Chapter 13 pg 190 "The Tempest" (III, i)

...the strongest oaths are straw
To the fire i' the blood: be more abstemious
Or else...
Chapter 13 "The Tempest" (IV, i)

"Timon of Athens"

for those milk-paps,
That through the window-bars bore at men's eyes
Chapter 13, pg 194 "Timon of Athens" (IV, iii)

"Troilus and Cressida"

Her eyes, her hair, her cheek, her gait, her voice,
Handlest in thy discourse, O, that her hand,
In whose comparison all whites are ink,
Writing their own reproach, to whose soft seizure
The cygnet's down is harsh…
Chapter 9, pg 146 "Troilus and Cressida" (I, i)

Outliving beauty's outward, with a mind
That doth renew swifter than blood decays!
Chapter 13, pg 195 "Troilus and Cressida" (III, ii)

But value dwells not in particular will;
It holds his estimate and dignity
As well wherein 'tis precious of itself
As in the prizer:
Chapter 17, pg 242 "Troilus and Cressida" (II, ii)

"Julius Caesar"

Lend me your ears
Chaptr 15 "Julius Caesar" (III, ii)


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Поможем сделать НИР

Look at other dictionaries:

  • List of songs that retell a work of literature — This is a list of songs which retell, in whole or in part, a work of literature. Albums listed here consist entirely of songs retelling a work of literature. 0 9 * 1984 by David Bowie is one of many songs he wrote about George Orwell s 1984 ,… …   Wikipedia

  • Shakespeare, William — (baptized April 26, 1564, Stratford upon Avon, Warwickshire, Eng. died April 23, 1616, Stratford upon Avon) British poet and playwright, often considered the greatest writer in world literature. He spent his early life in Stratford upon Avon,… …   Universalium

  • List of characters in Time Squad — This is a list of characters, including historical figures, that appear in the animated television series Time Squad . Major characters * Beauregard Buck Tuddrussel (Rob Paulsen): A burly time cop in the peak of physical condition, Buck is less… …   Wikipedia

  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country — Theatrical release poster by John Alvin Directed by Nicholas Meyer …   Wikipedia

  • George Orwell — Eric Blair redirects here. For the politician, see Eric Blair (Ontario politician). George Orwell Orwell s press card portrait, taken in 1933 Born Eric Arthur Blair 25 June 1903( …   Wikipedia

  • The Handmaid's Tale — For the film adaptation, see The Handmaid s Tale (film). For the operatic adaptation, see The Handmaid s Tale (opera). The Handmaid s Tale   …   Wikipedia

  • Enter Magneto — Infobox Television episode Title =Enter Magneto Series = Caption =Magneto Season = 1 Episode = 3 Airdate =November 27, 1992 Production =103 Writer =Jim Carlson Terrence McDonnell Director = Guests = Episode list = List of X Men 1992 TV Series… …   Wikipedia

  • La Marseillaise — This article is about the song. For the sculpture, see Arc de Triomphe. La Marseillaise English: The Song of Marseille Rouget de Lisle, composer of the Marseilla …   Wikipedia

  • The Dunciad — Alexander Pope The Dunciad /ˈd …   Wikipedia

  • Troilus — [ Etruscan fresco, Tomb of the Bulls, Tarquinia, c540 530BC.] Troilus (also Troilos, Troylus) (Ancient Greek: Τρωίλος, Troïlos, Latin: Troilus) is a legendary character associated with the story of the Trojan War. The first surviving reference to …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”