The Diocese of Meath

The Diocese of Meath

"The Diocese of Meath" is a nineteenth century publication on the history of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Meath from medieval to nineteenth century times, written by one of the Diocese's priests, Dean Cogan, a priest in Navan, the then Diocesan capital.

Published in two volumes in 1862 and 1867, it was an important history of Christianity in Ireland, because Cogan made use of three sources of information:

* folklore and memories of people alive in Meath the 1850s and 1860s (covering the period from the Penal Laws to the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49)) which were recorded in great detail.
* access to the Meath diocese's archives; when the Roman Catholic Bishop of Meath moved from his former seat in Navan to the new cathedral in Mullingar in the early twentieth century (the diocesan seminary, "St. Finians", also moved from Navan to Mullingar) the diocesan archives were lost in the process. How the priceless records, many of them by Cogan in his research in the 1860s, were lost remains a mystery;
* access to papers relating to the church in Meath in the Irish Public Records Office. The Irish Public Records Office was destroyed by the Irish Republican Army in 1922, in effect destroying one thousand years of records, including most of the records from that source quoted by Cogan.

As a result, Cogan's book details parish histories, information on derelict churches, information on old burial sites where those who died in the Famine were buried, names of priests, details of the Penal Law, and information on the re-appearance of a Roman Catholic clerical structure following the reformation from sources that are no longer available to historians.


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Diocese of Meath and Kildare — The United Dioceses of Meath and Kildare is a diocese in the Church of Ireland located in Ireland. The diocese is in the ecclesiastical province of Dublin.[1] Contents 1 Overview and history 1.1 History of the diocese of Meath …   Wikipedia

  • Diocese of Meath — For the book by Dean Cogan, see The Diocese of Meath. Christianity portal The Diocese of Meath is an Irish diocese which took its name after the ancient Kingdom of Meath. In the Roman Catholic Church it still exists as a separate diocese, but in… …   Wikipedia

  • Roman Catholic Diocese of Meath — Diocese of Meath Dioecesis Midensis The Cathedral of Christ the King, Mullingar Location …   Wikipedia

  • Meath — • Diocese in Ireland, suffragan of Armagh Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Meath     Meath     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Diocese of Kildare and Leighlin — The Diocese of Kildare and Leighlin was established in the year A.D. 519 as the Diocese of Kildare and renamed as the Diocese of Kildare and Leighlin in A.D. 1678. [ [http://www.gcatholic.com/dioceses/diocese/kild0.htm Diocese of Kildare and… …   Wikipedia

  • The Irish (in Countries Other Than Ireland) —     The Irish (in countries other than Ireland)     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Irish (in countries other than Ireland)     I. IN THE UNITED STATES     Who were the first Irish to land on the American continent and the time of their arrival are …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Meath — may refer to: County Meath, Republic of Ireland Kingdom of Mide, medieval precursor of the county Meath (constituency), in UK and Irish parliaments Meath GAA, including the intercounty football and hurling teams Diocese of Meath (disambiguation)… …   Wikipedia

  • Meath Archaeological and Historical Society — The Meath Archaeological and Historical Society is the main local historical society in County Meath. It is best known for its annual periodical of essays on Meath history called Ríocht na Midhe (Irish language (Gaeilge): The Kingdom of Meath ).… …   Wikipedia

  • Diocese of Bath and Wells — Location Ecclesiastical province Canterbury Archdeaconries …   Wikipedia

  • Diocese of Winchester — Location Ecclesiastical province Canterbury Archdeaconries Bournemouth, Winchester Statistics Parishes …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”