Web content management system

Web content management system

A Web content management system (WCMS or Web CMS) is content management system (CMS) software, usually implemented as a Web application, for creating and managing HTML content. It is used to manage and control a large, dynamic collection of Web material (HTML documents and their associated images). A WCMS facilitates content creation, content control, editing, and many essential Web maintenance functions.

Usually the software provides authoring (and other) tools designed to allow users with little or no knowledge of programming languages or markup languages to create and manage content with relative ease of use.

Most systems use a database to store content, metadata, and/or artifacts that might be needed by the system. Content is frequently, but not universally, stored as XML, to facilitate reuse and enable flexible presentation options. [cite web|url=http://www.managingenterprisecontent.com |author=Ethier, Kay, and Scott Abel |title=Introduction to Structured Content Management with XML |publisher=CMS Watch |accessdate=2007-11-12] [cite web|url=http://www.bluestream.com/xdbres/Content/Business/whitepaper/XmlCms/Outline.html |author=Tivy, Jim, et al. |title=The XML Content Management System for Document Centric XML |publisher=Bluestream Database Software Corporation |accessdate=2007-11-12]

A presentation layer displays the content to regular Web-site visitors based on a set of templates. The templates are sometimes XSLT files. [cite web|url=http://woric.net/wsg_presentation/Part1_using_xslt.xf |author=Woric Faithfull |title=Using XSLT to Make Websites |publisher=woric.net |accessdate=2007-11-08]

Administration is typically done through browser-based interfaces, but some systems require the use of a fat client.

Unlike Web-site builders like Microsoft FrontPage or Adobe Dreamweaver, a WCMS allows non-technical users to make changes to an existing website with little or no training. A WCMS typically requires an experienced coder to set up and add features, but is primarily a Web-site "maintenance" tool for non-technical administrators.

Capabilities

A WCMS is a software system used to manage and control a large, dynamic collection of Web material (HTML documents and their associated images). A CMS facilitates document control, auditing, editing, and timeline management. A WCMS provides the following key features:

;Automated templates: Create standard output templates (usually HTML and XML) that can be automatically applied to new and existing content, allowing the appearance of all of that content to be changed from one central place.;Easily editable content: Once content is separated from the visual presentation of a site, it usually becomes much easier and quicker to edit and manipulate. Most WCMS software includes WYSIWYG editing tools allowing non-technical individuals to create and edit content.;Scalable feature sets: Most WCMS software includes plug-ins or modules that can be easily installed to extend an existing site's functionality.;Web standards upgrades: Active WCMS software usually receives regular updates that include new feature sets and keep the system up to current web standards.;Workflow management: Workflow is the process of creating cycles of sequential and parallel tasks that must be accomplished in the CMS. For example, a content creator can submit a story, but it is not published until the copy editor cleans it up and the editor-in-chief approves it.;Document management: CMS software may provide a means of managing the life cycle of a document from initial creation time, through revisions, publication, archive, and document destruction.;Content virtualization: CMS software may provide a means of allowing each user to work within a virtual copy of the entire Web site, document set, and/or code base. This enables changes to multiple interdependent resources to be viewed and/or executed in-context prior to submission.

Types

There are three major types of WCMS: offline processing, online processing, and hybrid systems. These terms describe the deployment pattern for the WCMS in terms of when presentation templates are applied to render Web pages from structured content. Seth Gottlieb has used the terms 'baking', 'frying', and 'parbaking' to describe the three alternatives. [cite web|url=http://contenthere.blogspot.com/2007/06/cms-deployment-patterns.html|author=Gottlieb,Seth |title=CMS Deployment Patterns |publisher=Enter Content Here |accessdate=2007-06-11]

Offline processing

These systems pre-process all content, applying templates before publication to generate Web pages. sagar Vignette CMS and Bricolage are examples of this type of system. Since pre-processing systems do not require a server to apply the templates at request time, they may also exist purely as design-time tools; Adobe Contribute is an example of this approach.

Online processing

These systems apply templates on-demand. HTML may be generated when a user visits the page, or pulled from a cache. Some of the better known open source systems that produce pages on demand are Mambo, Joomla!, Drupal, WordPress, Zikula and Plone. Hosted CMSs are provided by such SaaS developers as Bravenet, UcoZ, Freewebs. Most Web application frameworks perform template processing in this way, but they do not necessarily incorporate content management features. Wikis, e.g. MediaWiki and TWiki generally follow an online model (with varying degrees of cacheing), but generally not provide document workflow.

Hybrid Systems

Some systems combine the offline and online approaches. Some systems write out executable code (e.g. JSP, PHP, Perl pages) rather than just static HTMLFact|date=March 2008, so that the CMS itself does not need to be deployed on every Web server. Other hybrids, such as Blosxom, are capable of operating in either an online or offline mode. [cite web|url=http://blosxom.sourceforge.net/documentation/users/configure/static.html
accessdate=2008-03-20
title=blosxom :: the zen of blogging :: documentation/users/configure/static.txt
date=2007-08-28
]

Web Content Management History

Web Content Management Systems began to be formally developed as a commercial software product in 1995 by two startups, Sunnyvale, California-based Interwoven and its flagship TeamSite product and Austin, Texas-based Vignette's Vignette Content Management product. As the internet began to grow, likewise, the importance of Web Content Management as a part of IT infrastructure began to grow, other vendors in adjacent markets began to develop their own WCM solutions including Documentum and FileNet who had traditionally built Document Management software. Other WCM providers such as Stellent and RedDot Solutions also began to appear. By 2002, IT departments began seeking out a single vendor who could manage all of their unstructured content (documents, web pages, rich media, etc.) and WCM became a sub-set of a new, supercategory, Enterprise Content Management (ECM) which it still remains a part of today.

In the mid 2000s, the web content management market became an even more fragmented market as a plethora of new providers emerged to compliment the traditional ECM vendors. These Web Content Management systems are typically broken down into several groups: Enterprise (Vignette, Interwoven, Documentum, Oracle and others), Mid-market (Ektron, PaperThin, Ingeniux, and others), Open source (Joomla, Drupal, Alfresco and others) and SaaS (Clickability, Crownpeak, Hot Banana and others).

References

See also

* Content management systems
* List of content management systems

External links

* [http://www.cmstester.net CMS Reviews] - CMS Reviews and Articles
* [http://www.cmsmatrix.org CMS Matrix] - CMS comparison tool
* [http://cmswatch.com/CMS/2008 CMS Watch] - Vendor Independent technical evaluations of content management systems.
* [http://www.aiim.org AIIM - The ECM Association] - Non-profit organization, providing resources related to all variations of Content Management systems (ECM, WCM, CMS, Enterprise, CMS, 2.0, etc.)
* [http://www.kelowna-web-design.com/content-management-system/ Tru Design Media CMS] - Rapidly growing enterprise content management solution
* [http://www.opensourcecms.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=388&Itemid=143 CMS Ratings] - Open source CMS Ratings
* [http://www.waterandstone.com/resources.html 2008 Open Source CMS Market Share Report] - Report on market share of 19 of the most popular open source content management systems.
* [http://www.2b.ceomalaya.com] - CMS solution.To compare the CMS usability between Joomla and Drupa.You can participate in online survey menu provided
* [http://www.paginaswebcms.com PaginaswebCMS] - PaginaswebCMS


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