The Optimist's Daughter

The Optimist's Daughter

infobox Book |
name = The Optimist's Daughter
title_orig =
translator =


image_caption =
author = Eudora Welty
illustrator =
cover_artist =
country = United States
language = English
series =
genre = Novel
publisher =
release_date = 1972
english_release_date =
media_type = Print (Hardback & Paperback)
pages = 208 pp
isbn =
preceded_by =
followed_by =

"The Optimist's Daughter" is a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction winning 1972 short novel by Eudora Welty. It concerns a woman named Laurel, who travels to New Orleans to take care of her father, Judge McKelva, after he has surgery for a detached retina. He fails to recover from the surgery, though, surrenders to his age, and dies slowly as Laurel reads to him from Dickens. Her father's second wife Fay, who is younger than Laurel, is a shrewish outsider from Texas. Her shrill response to the Judge's illness appears to accelerate his demise. Laurel and Fay are thrown together when they return the Judge to his home town of Mount Salus, Mississippi, where he will be buried. There, Laurel is immersed in the enveloping good neighborliness of the friends and family she knew before marrying and moving away to Chicago. Fay, though, has always been unwelcome and takes off for a long weekend, leaving Laurel in the big house full of memories. Laurel encounters her mother's memory, her father's life after he lost his first wife, and the complex emotions surrounding her loss and the wave of memories in which she swims. She comes to a place of understanding that Fay can never share, and leaves small town Mississippi with the memories she can carry with her. [ [http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/11/22/specials/welty-daughter.html New York Times] ]

Web sources


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • The Confessions of Nat Turner — (1st edition)   …   Wikipedia

  • The Old Man and the Sea — For other uses, see The Old Man and the Sea (disambiguation). The Old Man and the Sea   …   Wikipedia

  • The Wayward Bus — by John Steinbeck, is one of Steinbeck s lesser novels. It features clear writing and character delineation.Originally published in 1947, this novel contains several references to the recent Second World War (such as a wall chart of mandatory pr …   Wikipedia

  • The Tramp — The Tramp, also known as The Little Tramp ( Charlot internationally, Carlitos in Brazilian Portuguese) was Charlie Chaplin s most memorable on screen character, a recognized icon of world cinema most dominant during the silent film era.The Tramp …   Wikipedia

  • Atomic Lullabies - Very Best of The Blow Monkeys — Infobox Album Name = Atomic Lullabies Very Best of The Blow Monkeys Type = compilation Artist = The Blow Monkeys Released = 1999 Recorded = 1984 1990 Genre = glam / jazz / punk pop rock new wave funky dance Soul ballad UK garage Length = 123:17… …   Wikipedia

  • Malaysia at the 2006 Asian Games — Malaysia at the 15th Asian Games Flag of Malaysia …   Wikipedia

  • Franklin Library — The Franklin Library was the publishing division of the Franklin Mint, which produced collectors books similar to those of the Easton Press for three decades. HistoryThe Franklin Library published its first book in 1973, and closed its doors for… …   Wikipedia

  • Pulitzer Prize for Fiction — The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. It replaced the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel.* 2008: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot… …   Wikipedia

  • National Book Award for Fiction — The National Book Award for Fiction has been given since 1950, as part of the National Book Awards, which are given annually by the National Book Foundation. Of all the awards given, the Fiction award is the only one that has been given… …   Wikipedia

  • Nicholas Nickleby — The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Pour les articles homonymes, voir Nicholas Nickleby (homonymie). Nicholas Nickleby …   Wikipédia en Français

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”