Wyandot language

Wyandot language

language
name=Wyandot
states=Canada, United States
region=northeastern Oklahoma, Quebec
script=modified Latin alphabet
familycolor=American
fam1=Iroquoian
fam2=Northern Iroquoian
fam3=Proto-Lake Iroquoian
fam4=Huron
extinct=Spoken until recently near Sandwich, Ontario and Wyandotte, Oklahoma. There were 2 older adult speakers still alive in 1961.
iso3=wya

Wyandot is the Iroquoian language traditionally spoken by the people known variously as Wyandot, Wendat, or Huron. It was last spoken primarily in Oklahoma and Quebec. Wyandot no longer has any native speakers, but is being studied and promoted as a second language. Anthropologist John Steckley was reported in 2007 as being the last speaker of Wyandot. J. Goddard, [http://www.thestar.com/News/Ontario/article/288382 Scholar sole speaker of Huron language] , Toronto Star, Dec 24, 2007.] .

The Language is written with the Latin Alphabet, making use of two extra letters, θ for IPA|/θ/, and unicode|Ȣ for IPA|/u/.

The lyrics of the Christmas hymn Huron Carol, written in 1643 by the missionary Jean de Brébeuf, were originally written in Wyandot.

Examples:

*"Senet"-Stop, used on road signs (with "arrêt") in some Huron reserves, such as Wendake in Quebec.
*"Skat"-One
*"Tindee"-Two
*"Shenk"-Three
*"Anduak"-Four
*"Weeish"-Five
*"Sandustee"-Water

Notes

ources

*ethnologue|code=wya|label=Wyandot
*http://www.native-languages.org/wyandot_words.htm


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  • Wyandot — Huron redirects here. For other uses, see Huron (disambiguation). Infobox Ethnic group group=Wendat (Huron, Wyandot, Wyandotte) poptime=circa 2001: 8,000Fact|date=January 2008 popplace=Canada ndash; Quebec, southwest Ontario; United States ndash; …   Wikipedia

  • Wyandot (langue) — Wyandot Pour les articles homonymes, voir Comté de Wyandot et Comté de Wyandotte. Wyandot Parlée au  Canada …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Wyandot — [wī′ən dät΄] adj., n. pl. Wyandots or Wyandot [< Wyandot wé·n dat] 1. a member of a North American Indian group formed in the 17th cent. from Huron speaking peoples of W Ontario: living first in Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario, and now living in… …   English World dictionary

  • Wyandot County, Ohio — Infobox U.S. County county = Wyandot County state = Ohio founded year = 1845cite web|url = http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Wyandot.pdf |title = Ohio County Profiles: Wyandot County |accessdate = 2007 04 28 |publisher = Ohio… …   Wikipedia

  • Wyandot — /wuy euhn dot /, n., pl. Wyandots, (esp. collectively) Wyandot for 1. 1. an Indian of the former Huron confederacy. 2. a dialect of the Huron language, esp. as used by those elements of the Huron tribe regrouped in Oklahoma. Also, Wyandotte. * *… …   Universalium

  • Wyandot — /ˈwaɪəndɒt/ (say wuyuhndot) noun 1. a Native American of the former Huron people or confederacy. A few survivors of mixed descent now live in Oklahoma, but the Huron language is extinct. 2. an Iroquoian language, now extinct. –adjective 3. of or… …   Australian-English dictionary

  • Wyandot — noun Etymology: of Iroquoian origin; akin to Huron (Iroquoian language of the Hurons) ouendat, a self designation, Mohawk skawę •nat one language Date: 1749 a member of an American Indian group formed in the 17th century by Hurons and other… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Wyandot — ISO 639 3 Code : wya ISO 639 2/B Code : ISO 639 2/T Code : ISO 639 1 Code : Scope : Individual Language Type : Extinct …   Names of Languages ISO 639-3

  • Wyandot — Wy•an•dot [[t]ˈwaɪ ənˌdɒt[/t]] n. pl. dots, (esp. collectively) dot. 1) peo a member of an American Indian tribe formed from dispersed elements of the Hurons and closely related peoples in the mid 17th century 2) peo the extinct Iroquoian… …   From formal English to slang

  • Ojibwa-Ottawa language — Infobox Language name=Ojibwa Ottawa language nativename=ᐊᓂᔑᓈᐯᒧᐎᓐ Anishinaabemowin pronunciation=/ənɪʃʰɪnaːpeːmowɪn/ or /ənɪʰʃɪnaːpeːmowɪn/ states=Flag|Canada, Flag|United States region=western Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and into Saskatchewan, with …   Wikipedia

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