Boater

Boater

A boater (also basher, skimmer, katie, or sennit hat) is a kind of hat associated with sailing and boating.

It is normally made of sennit straw and has a flat crown and brim, typically with a ribbon around the crown, which is often in colours representing a school, rowing crew or similar institution. Boaters were popular as summer headgear in the late 19th century and early 20th century, and were supposedly worn by FBI agents as a sort of unofficial uniform in the pre-war years. Nowadays they are rarely seen except at sailing or rowing events, period theatrical and musical performances (e.g. barbershop music) or as part of old-fashioned school uniform, such as at Harrow School.

Inexpensive foam or plastic skimmers are sometimes seen at political rallies in the United States. [http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/


] [http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/

] [http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/images/02/20/gall.delegates.gi.jpg]

In Australia, New Zealand and South Africa the boater is still a common part of the school uniform in many boys schools, such as Shore School and Knox Grammar School.

Being made of straw, the boater was and is generally regarded as a warm-weather hat. In the days when men all wore hats when out of doors, "Straw Hat Day", the day when men switched from wearing their winter hats to their summer hats, was seen as a sign of the beginning of summer. The exact date of Straw Hat Day might vary slightly from place to place. For example, in Philadelphia, it was May 15; at the University of Pennsylvania, it was the second Saturday in May [ [http://www.archives.upenn.edu/histy/features/traditions/heyday/straw_hat.html Straw Hat Day, University of Pennsylvania Archives ] ] .

The boater is a fairly formal hat, equivalent in formality to the Homburg, and so is correctly worn either in its original setting with a blazer, or in the same situations as a Homburg, such as a smart lounge suit, or with black tie.

References


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • boater — ► NOUN 1) a flat topped straw hat with a brim. [ORIGIN: originally worn while boating.] 2) a person who travels in a boat …   English terms dictionary

  • boater — [bōt′ər] n. [ BOAT + ER: orig. worn when boating] 1. a stiff hat of braided straw, with a flat crown and brim 2. a person who boats …   English World dictionary

  • Boater — Recorded in the spellings of Boat, Boate, Bote, Boater, Booter, Boother, Boatman, or Bowater, this is a medieval English surname. Its origins are confused and overlapping, and there are several possible sources. The first is that it can be either …   Surnames reference

  • boater — [[t]bo͟ʊtə(r)[/t]] boaters N COUNT A boater or a straw boater is a hard straw hat with a flat top and brim which is often worn for certain social occasions in the summer …   English dictionary

  • boater — UK [ˈbəʊtə(r)] / US [ˈboʊtər] noun [countable] Word forms boater : singular boater plural boaters 1) a circular hat with a low flat top and a wide brim, usually made of straw (= dried stems of wheat) for wearing in sunny weather 2) someone who… …   English dictionary

  • Boater — Ein Strohhut ist eine Kopfbedeckung, oft ein Sonnenhut aus geflochtenem Stroh. Strohhut, auch Kreissäge genannt Eine in den 1920er Jahren aufgekommene Männermode war der kleine runde Florentiner Strohhut, der wegen seiner Kreisform auch Kreissäge …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Boater (disambiguation) — Boater may refer to: *Boater, a type of hat *Someone involved in boating …   Wikipedia

  • boater — noun Date: 1605 1. one who travels in a boat 2. a stiff hat usually made of braided straw with a brim, hatband, and flat crown …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • boater — /boh teuhr/, n. 1. a person who boats, esp. for pleasure. 2. a stiff straw hat with a shallow, flat topped crown, ribbon band, and straight brim. [1595 1605; BOAT + ER1] * * * …   Universalium

  • boater — noun a) Someone who travels by boat b) A straw hat Syn: boatsman, boatman, Panama, leghorn …   Wiktionary

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