Director's chair

Director's chair
Statue of a director′s chair in Hong Kong.

A director's chair[1][2] is a lightweight chair that folds side-to-side with a scissors action. The seat and back are made of canvas or a similar strong fabric which bears the user's full weight and can be folded; the frame is made of wood, or sometimes metal or plastic. The seat and scissors members work together to support and distribute the sitter's weight so that the seat is comfortably taut. The back is usually low and the chair usually has armrests. The stereotypical image of a movie director on location includes one of these chairs, hence the name. Victor Papanek describes this chair as an excellent design in his book Design for the Real World as it is simple and ideally suited to its function. The design goes back to coffer-makers' chairs of the 15th century and eventually to the Roman curule chair.

The modern American style director's chairs were introduced by the Gold Medal Camp Furniture company. In 1892, the Gold Medal Classic design won an award for excellence in casual furniture design in the lead-up to the 1893 World's Fair Columbian Exposition in Chicago.[3] Gold Medal Directors Chairs are now manufactured in Tennessee by The Lord's Table, Inc.[4] and sold by retailers including TheChairStore.com[5] and DirectorsChairSupply.com[6].

See also

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Поможем сделать НИР

Look at other dictionaries:

  • director's chair — n. [from its use on the set by film directors] a lightweight folding armchair, usually a wooden or metal frame with a canvas back and seat …   English World dictionary

  • director's chair — noun Etymology: so called from its use by movie directors : a lightweight usually folding armchair with a back and seat usually of cotton duck * * * diˈrector s chair 7 [director s chair] noun a folding wooden chair with crossed legs, a seat and… …   Useful english dictionary

  • director's chair — /dəˈrɛktəz tʃɛə/ (say duh rektuhz chair) noun a simple collapsible chair consisting of a frame with a cloth seat and back. {from the use of this style of chair by film directors while on the set} …  

  • director's chair — direc′tor s chair n. fur a lightweight folding armchair with transversely crossed legs and a canvas seat and back panel traditionally used by motion picture directors • Etymology: 1950–55 …   From formal English to slang

  • director's chair — noun Etymology: from its use by motion picture directors on the set Date: 1953 a lightweight folding armchair with a back and seat usually of cotton duck …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • director's chair — a lightweight folding armchair with transversely crossed legs and having a canvas seat and back panel, as traditionally used by motion picture directors. [1950 55] * * * …   Universalium

  • Steven Spielberg's Director's Chair — Infobox VG| title = Steven Spielberg s Director s Chair developer = Knowledge Adventure publisher = Knowledge Adventure released = 1996 (US) genre = Simulation modes = Single player platforms = Windows, Macintosh media = CD requirements = PC:… …   Wikipedia

  • chair — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. chairperson, man, or woman, convenor, coordinator, moderator, speaker, master of ceremonies, MC, emcee, toastmaster, roastmaster (sl.); seat (See furniture); professorship, judgeship, fellowship. See… …   English dictionary for students

  • Director of Floor Operations — is the title of two staff members in the United States House of Representatives, with the Majority Director in the Speaker s office and the Minority Director in the Minority Leader s or Minority Whip s office. Each director is primarily… …   Wikipedia

  • Chair (official) — Chair is a term frequently used for the highest office in an assembly such as a committee, commission, or board. The term is also applied to the holder of the office. While the term chairman remains in widespread use, chairperson , and chair have …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”