Equivalence partitioning

Equivalence partitioning

Equivalence partitioning is a software testing related technique with the goal:
#To reduce the number of test cases to a necessary minimum. "'
#To select the right test cases to cover all possible scenarios."'

Although in rare cases equivalence partitioning is also applied to outputs of a software component, typically it is applied to the inputs of a tested component. The equivalence partitions are usually derived from the specification of the component's behaviour. An input has certain ranges which are valid and other ranges which are invalid. This may be best explained by the example of a function which takes a parameter "month". The valid range for the month is 1 to 12, representing January to December. This valid range is called a partition. In this example there are two further partitions of invalid ranges. The first invalid partition would be <= 0 and the second invalid partition would be >= 13.

... -2 -1 0 1 .............. 12 13 14 15 ..... --------------|-------------------|--------------------- invalid partition 1 valid partition invalid partition 2

The testing theory related to equivalence partitioning says that only one test case of each partition is needed to evaluate the behaviour of the program for the related partition. In other words it is sufficient to select one test case out of each partition to check the behaviour of the program. To use more or even all test cases of a partition will not find new faults in the program. The values within one partition are considered to be "equivalent". Thus the number of test cases can be reduced considerably.

An additional effect by applying this technique is that you also find the so called "dirty" test cases. An inexperienced tester may be tempted to use as test cases the input data 1 to 12 for the month and forget to select some out of the invalid partitions. This would lead to a huge number of unnecessary test cases on the one hand, and a lack of test cases for the dirty ranges on the other hand.

The tendency is to relate equivalence partitioning to so called black box testingwhich is strictly checking a software component at its interface, without consideration of internal structures of the software. But having a closer look at the subject there are cases where it applies to grey box testing as well. Imagine an interface to a component which has a valid range between 1 and 12 like in the example above. However internally the function may have a differentiation of values between 1 and 6 and the values between 7 and 12. Depending on the input value the software internally will run through different paths to perform slightly different actions. Regarding the input and output interfaces to the component this difference will not be noticed, however in your grey-box testing you would like to make sure that both paths are examined. To achieve this it is necessary to introduce additional equivalence partitions which would not be needed for black-box testing. For this example this would be:

... -2 -1 0 1 ..... 6 7 ..... 12 13 14 15 ..... --------------|---------|----------|--------------------- invalid partition 1 P1 P2 invalid partition 2 valid partitions To check for the expected results you would need to evaluate some internal intermediate values rather than the output interface.

Equivalence partitioning is no stand alone method to determine test cases. It has to be supplemented by boundary value analysis. Having determined the partitions of possible inputs the method of boundary value analysis has to be applied to select the most effective test cases out of these partitions.

Equivalence partioning:--- A Black Box test design technique in which test cases are designed to execute representatives from equivalence partitions.In principle,test cases are designed to cover each partition at least once.


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