1954 Series (banknotes)

1954 Series (banknotes)

The 1954 Series was the third series of banknotes the Bank of Canada issued. The second variant was issued in 1956.

The third series of Bank of Canada bank notes was prepared in 1952. Significant changes to the design of Canada's paper currency gave it a whole new look that set the standard for the future.

With the ascension to the throne of Queen Elizabeth II in 1952, plates were prepared for the third series of Bank of Canada notes. They were very different from the 1937 series, although the colours and bilingual nature were retained. Like the previous series, English was always on the left. The portrait was moved from the centre of the bank note to the right-hand side where it was less susceptible to wear caused by the folding of notes. The elaborate detail of earlier issues was simplified, and the earlier allegorical figures were replaced by Canadian landscapes. The Canadian coat of arms was first introduced in this series and formed part of the background design. This is the only series on which the portrait of the Queen appears on all denominations.

This series caused controversy because highlighted areas of the Queen's hair gave the illusion of a grinning demon behind the ear. The term "Devil's Head" is commonly used to describe these bank notes. The Bank of Canada had both bank note companies modify the face plates by darkening the highlights in the hair. These modifications were made in 1956 for all denominations.

A $1 note commemorating the centennial of Canadian Confederation was issued on 3 January 1967, half year before the event. Compared to the regular $1 note, the commemorative version has a different back that shows the original Parliament Buildings, a logo on the face, and commemorative legend in the borders of both sides.

All bills measure 152.4 × 69.85 mm (6 × 2¾ inches).


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Поможем сделать НИР

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Banknotes of the Canadian dollar — Canadian banknotes are the banknotes of Canada, denominated in Canadian dollars (CAD). In common everyday usage, they are called bills. Currently, they are issued in five, ten, twenty, fifty, and hundred dollar denominations. All notes are issued …   Wikipedia

  • Banknotes of the pound sterling — Banknotes of the pound sterling …   Wikipedia

  • Banknotes of the Indonesian rupiah — The first paper money used in the Indonesian archipelago was that of the United East Indies Company, credit letters of the rijksdaalder dating between 1783 and 1811. Netherlands Indian gulden government credit paper followed in 1815, and from… …   Wikipedia

  • Banknotes of the Norwegian krone — Norwegian banknotes are circulated, in addition to Norwegian coins, with a denomination of Norwegian kroner, as standard units of currency in Norway. History From 1877, after the establishment of the Scandinavian Monetary Union, and until present …   Wikipedia

  • Withdrawn Canadian banknotes — Among Canadian currency, only five different banknotes are currently printed. Smaller denominations have been replaced by coins, and larger ones are felt to be no longer required in an era of electronic transmission of most large transactions.… …   Wikipedia

  • Pont du Faubourg — Pays  Canada …   Wikipédia en Français

  • History of Canadian currency — Canada has an extensive history with regards to its currency. Beginning in the early 16th Century, items such as wampum and furs were actually considered currency. With the colonization of France and England, various coins were introduced in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Nickel (Canadian coin) — Nickel Canada Value 0.05 CAD Mass  3.95 g Diameter  21.2 mm Thickness  1.76 mm …   Wikipedia

  • Coins of the Canadian dollar — Canadian coinage is the coinage of Canada, produced by the Royal Canadian Mint and denominated in Canadian dollars ($) or cents (¢). Contents 1 Denominations 2 Changes in coinage 3 Production …   Wikipedia

  • Newfoundland dollar — $1 ISO 4217 code NFD …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”